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Old 01-18-2013, 12:14 PM
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Default Re: Joan Wulff Fly line

Lee and Joan Wulff developed this Triangle Taper concept starting in the later 1980's. Both are/where great fly fishers and casters. The idea is that the line tapers from a fine tip continuously to its thickest point at the back end of the head, some 30+' into the line. From the thickest diameter, the rear taper reduces precipitously to extra thin running line over a few feet. Essentially TT is a long, one-piece shooting head but, with the continuously diminishing diameter, is intended to alight a fly with delicacy. Two of my fishing buddy's swear by this line both for trout and saltwater flats presentations. Both believe is showing a fish the fly as far away as possible to avoid boat sound spooking the fish. They are always extending the full head and shooting running line. Neither is inclined to make in close short casts and there-in lies an issue: if you need to make a 25 foot cast and you have a 12' leader, you are only going to have 13' of line beyond your tip top to work with. With an average WF line you would have say 7' of front taper and 6' of belly to work with, underlining your rod some but you would cast off the tip with a bit of wrist snap and would be fine. However, with the continuous taper of the TT, you would virtually have tip only with really low even inadequate mass to load your rod with, truly handicapping your rod loading and line handling potential. So if most of your fishing will involve aerializing the head of your line rather than shorter casts this line may work well for you with the only remaining draw back being the dramatic hinge point where the thickest part of the head meets the thin running line. I have fished this line both for trout and bonefish and achieved very delicate presentations with it but, with full respect and admiration for its inventors, I believe there are superior fly line tapers available.
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