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Old 01-18-2013, 02:41 PM
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Default Re: Why did you go two hand?

Quote:
Originally Posted by derelict View Post
Thanks for all of the replies. I am trying to find something in the 10 to 11 foot range. Casting my 5 weight is fine but when I suspect that the moment I move up in weight, the shoulder will not like it too much. So, I guess I am looking for an 8 weight switch rod, right? Seems that most two handed rods are longer than 10 or 11. I think any longer would hurt me in that the local waters arent big enough for a big rod like that.
Fred and some of the other two hand experts can and I'm sure will chime in on this but here's my take.

When you go 2 handed, forget about the rod weight as you think about them with single hands. It's all about the grain window. Why is this important? You need to consider the types/sizes of flies you are going to use, what sort of casting you'll be doing as well as the species of fish you'll be casting to.

Again, for some perspective, I am using a 6wt rod with switch line that suits the type of fishing I'm doing on the Great Lakes for Lake Run steelies. It's got enough power to handle Lake Erie fish but I might be a little under gunned in NY, MI, or WI. Remember, a longer rod will help you handle larger fish. An 8wt is a pretty serious stick, I might consider a 7wt.

Going with a light rod would give you some versatility so if you wanted to single hand cast your two hander it's easiER. Beulah has rods between 10 and 11 foot, and there are lots that are in the 11 to 12 range as well.

I test casted (as well as I can cast) a Sage One 7116 several weeks ago, wow was I impressed. Very light for a long rod and lots of backbone.

Still say if you're going this route, you should really consider going to a fly shop that carries these rods and cast some. Not to discourage a 2 handed purchase, but to get first hand knowledge and suggestions based on where you're going to fish it.
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