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Old 01-27-2013, 03:39 PM
silver creek silver creek is offline
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Default Re: Improving my cast

Quote:
Originally Posted by cletus View Post
I took a casting lesson last week for help with a tailing loop problem. Not a big shocker, too much wrist and too much force.

I was also taught a fade cast wherein after stopping the rod on the back cast, you allow the rod tip to travel back some more as the line straightens. When I got it right, it did solve my tailing loops. I had never heard of a fade before.
Now that you know the move, you might as well get the terminology right. The proper term is "drift". A rod drift repositions the rod in the direction of the previous cast as the line is unfurling. This repositioning of the fly rod increases the distance available for the next casting stroke. So if you drift the rod backward after the backcast stop, you will begin the forward stroke form further back, giving you a longer stroke for the next forward cast.

Fly rod Drifting

Why did this cure the tailing loop? I think your tailing loop was caused by a sudden jab or sudden acceleration when you try to add extra distance to your forward cast. By drifting, a longer stroke path allowed for a longer cast without the jab.

If you do not get tailing loops while false casting, I think you might be creeping the fly rod on your forward delivery cast. "Creep" is the opposite of "drift". Creep is the forward repositioning of the fly rod in the direction of the next cast, before the actual power stroke begins. Basically the caster anticipates the start of the next a cast. and begins moving the rod before the actual cast. This "creep" or early rod movement shortens the rod stroke and the caster tries to get more power into too short a stroke path. The caster "jabs" or shocks the rod in an attempt to increase line speed. This sudden application of power bends the rod ===> shortens the rod ===> dips the rod tip ===> concave rod tip path ===> tailing loop.

Creep and Jab | Cure this common casting blunder to get rid of tailing loops

It may be that the rod drift is canceling rod creep. So be mindful of rod creep when you try for extra distance.
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Regards,

Silver



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