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Old 02-03-2013, 02:06 PM
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Default Re: Drying motor question.

I got a motor, actually two of them from Cabelas. Speed is not to horribly important. Fast enough to keep the flex coat from sagging and slow enough it isn't a NASA test for your rod is fine. I built mine right into the stand for my thread tension device. It really works out well. It adds weight to it so it doesn't try to slide around while I'm doing the thread. I made the arbors myself. I used an empty plastic sewing thread spool for heavy thread. It's shaped lile a cylinder with a pretty large flaired bottom. I put 4 screws in the flaired end for rubber bands. By the way, I like the rubber bands. It works fast and easy. Inside of the cylinder, I used a section of an aluminum arrow shaft and built it up with tape to fit the inside of the cylinder portion. After I glued it in with abou 5/8" sticking beyond the small end, I drilled and tapped it for a set screw. The shaft on the motor has a flat side. I did the same thing with the first motor except it was cork instead of the spool and I just used masking tape to secure the butt of the rod till it was dry. Bith work, both were essentially free, but I like the bands way best.

Rod stands are a snap to make. Make the U shaped rests for them by srilling a hole in the wood and then save the other half. You can either use it for a second set or a short set that holds the rod up and steady for doing the writting on it. On the end where the grip is I put two screws, and use a 1" web strap with holes burned in the end and two rubber bands. I originally came up with it to help out a blind friend of mine in a rod building class I helped with. If you are blind, wrapping thread either requires three hands or this thing.
Click the image to open in full size.

Here is the thread tension thing I mentioned. The rod tips are for keeping a constant tension even if you back the rod up a bit. Losing tension causes problems. The little second one changes the angle the thread hits the blank for when I do weaves, it makes it easier to do with the weave on top of the blank instead of over more on the side like it would be if I were setting down just wrapping.
Click the image to open in full size.

Here is the one with the cork end on the motor. It has the second rod tip I just mentioned. It also has two tension devices. There are some neat tricks I came up with that needs two. I also is handy if you are doing two colors and don't to have to keep changing thread spools..
Click the image to open in full size.

Here's how I set the motor in the thread stand. I added velcro straps to keep the cord out of the way when I'm not running it.
Click the image to open in full size.

Rod building is not as hard as some people think. It is fun in fact. Plus you get rods that are the way you want them. When you get really good at it you will have rods that are better than any factory rod around and look like it too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by williamhj View Post
People do take motors off of small appliances

I just apply it while the rod is on the wrapping stand and then put it on the dryer.
Rotisery (sp?) motors work good.

I do it the same way. You have better control and as long as you are not slower than molases it turns fast enough by hand not to sag.
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