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Old 02-15-2013, 11:52 AM
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Default Re: Warmwater flies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brian miville View Post
So long story short I have mostly used just spinning and baitcasting gear for bass and panfish. My cheap flyrod combo served as a side attraction for panfish. I am moving into a more flyfishing-centric mode of fishing. My fly collection right now is small, mainly some wooly buggers, muddler minnows and a bunch of small panfish poppers. I am using a 3wt for panfish and 5wt for bass in the sub 5 pound range (would say rough average size would be 3 pound.)

So here I am looking to beef up the collection, and I am seeking advice on what to buy (and if it matters I do plan on picking up tying eventually since I bought myself a fairly decent vise years ago but hardly used it....plus I have all the tools needed, but just a very basic collection of materials.) I already have an idea on some stuff I think I want to add like:

crayfish pattern
clouser minnow pattern
some kind of leech pattern
worm pattern

I have also had some decent luck using a royal coachman wet fly for panfish, so will probably get/make more of those as well as more of the poppers. I would also love a good damselfly pattern since one of my old bass honey holes had tons of them, and the bass would do aerobatics just to get to these things (I swear it was like their crack cocaine!)

So, any other suggestions or ideas? Both in patterns and pre-tied flies?

Thanks!
I am a popper nut as you will see on my posts and constantly designing, testing and selling them. About damsel flies... You are 100% correct. I sometimes watch bass follow damsel and dragon flies just waiting for them to get close enough to the surface and SPLASH!. I used to use the foam bodied damsels tied for trout, but the bass just shred them with violent hits, so I am working on a thin popper bodied damsel that is more durable and will look like a drowned damsel.

Now, the biggest bass I ever caught was pushing 27" and I caught it on a large dry fly called the Bass Skater that Harry Murray taught me to tie. You can probably figure out how to tie it from the picture. I use kiptail for the tail and wing. I typically tie it on a 1x long hook in size 8 and larger.

It is also easy to fish. Cast it, drag it just enough to form a "V" on the surface, but not to sink it. It can look like a hopper, hex, or stonefly... very versatile.

Click the image to open in full size.
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