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Old 02-18-2013, 10:56 AM
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Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

Quote:
Originally Posted by nick k View Post
but it is true that Spey rods are stiffer than single handers, and a 10/11 weight single can be used to catch big game saltwater fish.

I do want to be able to cast a certain distance, but there's no point if the fish can't even bend the rod when he's hooked. I don't want it to feel like I'm dragging it in with a steel bar.

To this point I think I might agree with the orvis people.
That's mostly not true. Scandi and Skagit rods are stiff, but only by two hand standards. A classic spey action is a slow rod. None of my two handers are fast stiff rods. I may or may not have mentioned that I have caught a lot of Bass on two handers. I have a 15 ft. 10/11 wt. that has seen a fair number of fish. Both Walleye and Bass, and Walleye don't fight as well as Bass do. I have never thought, "Oh my, this would be so much more fun on a girlie little rod!" There seems to be a lot of this wrong idea floating around out there, in fact this is the second time I have addressed it just this morning.

First of all, the rod weights are determined by what weight it takes to load the rod. Go pick up the head on a 5wt. line and the head on a 10 wt. line and tell me if you think that tiny difference is going to make the difference between feeling a fish fight and not. This whole idea that "Oh you can't use that rod for Bass because it's a Salmon rod" is a giant load of horse manure. Try it with single hand lines but just use the first 30' and tell me if you think it's going to make your rod act like a steel rod.

Rod weights are for throwing lines. Line wieights are for throwing flies. Like with a spinning rod, you can cast more weight farther. All of this talk that "that is to much rod for that fish" nonsense is rediculous. Especially when you are talking about Bass.

Seriously, where does it say anywhere on a rod what fish it's for? If the Orvis people said something contrary to that, they were from the clothing department and don't fish.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nick k View Post
But I'm looking for the right wt rod that a 2 or 3lb largemouth can actually bend more than a twitch at the top ferrule.
All of them do.
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