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Old 02-19-2013, 12:33 PM
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Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

I see that this is still going on, Bill (wt bash) has made some really good points and I can relate to what he says based on what I've learned in the past few years. While fishing in the lake at our cabin in summer of 2011 I had a very large pike come after the fly and grab hold while I was sweeping the line for what is called a perry poke cast. When the fish hit, the rod was pointed over my right shoulder (I was standing at the bow of our boat) and there was no way I could set the hook. I saw the pike coming after the fly but was helpless to do anything but watch. The fish went on under the boat and it was quite a circus until the hook came loose.

Point from what Bill said is; had I been using my 9' 9 weight I would have had that salmon killer in all likelihood. I do not like using the Spey rods in still water.

Getting back to the rod / line weight issue, I have no problems tying a small fly (say a #6 or 8 Bartleet hook) to a 700 grain or heavier line and proper leader. The heavy line and rod will cast it beautifully. Likewise I can attach a 36" lead head and a size 2/0 salmon fly and the rod and line will cast it beautifully. I believe the point of some recommending a heavier rod equates to this; you can easily catch a small fish on a big rod but catching a big fish on a small rod is not really very sporting if you are C&R fishing.

The recurring theme of a fish not even bending a #7 or 8 Spey rod is just not correct. I have caught many grayling with none over 2 pounds on a 13' #8 Spey rod and it was wonderful. Of course I am fishing in rivers with substantial currents and depth which combine to make the fish always feel larger than they turn out to be. If I were using a wispy rod landing a fish, even a small one in current would take a long and cruel time for the hapless fish. I do however believe that where I fish grayling, one of these days I'm going to hook a 4+ pound fish and the rod will be handy then. I frequently have a salmon get on the fly while grayling fishing in fall and again the heavier rod is appreciated. If your mind is made up then so it is and everyone here will wish you well with whatever rod you buy. Remember, you can always use a heavier leader to compensate for a lighter rod but heaving large flies and sink tips may become troublesome.

Ard
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