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Old 02-20-2013, 11:48 AM
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Default impact of rod color?

so, having rods of various colors I'm trying to correlate the impact of color on results, in terms of casting distance, number of hookups and the ability to land fish quickly (so as not to hurt them). It may be that the impact of color is only felt in the casting stroke, though I've heard others intimate that rod color, coupled with colors of rod socks and tubes can skew the results over time.

It's understood by some that color, whether of rod, sock or tube also drives the geographic orientation...for instance, green rods made in the west, which is really nearer the middle, but who cares....are best fished in the east because of the larger water molecules in the west. (that's what "big water is, right?)

Personally, I prefer brown rods in shorter lengths (6'6"-7'6") while grey, matte black and blue dominate my longer rods. It's suggested that the rate of refraction needed to move the rod thru the color spectrum slows the line speed to allow for a dry dropper....although yarn is clearly superior to thingamabobbers on a falling barometer.

Have there been studies that I've not found that explain, once and for all, the impact of the interrelation of rod color and line color? Combining this data and applying chi square test for statistical relevance revealed nothing, especially when factoring metal vs wood reel seats.

That doesn't even scratch the surface of wader and shirt color in the equation. Blue shirts with tan waders can provide the same reaction as tan shoes with pink shoelaces, although that song came from the '60s...and tie dye was left out of the study.

Can anyone help?
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