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Old 02-21-2013, 10:39 AM
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Default Re: Nostalgia of Bamboo Rods

WJC, its cane's inherent mass. It creates and absorbs energy better than graphite as there is more material there. Imagine an empty paper towel roll as a graphite rod, drop it on the floor it bounces, shakes, rattles, and rolls a bit and all that, now take a full roll of paper towel (cane fly rod) and do the same. Plop, it hits its done. Casting cane rods is like slow dancing with a lady, if you dance well, it pushes all the right buttons and she rewards you with a sweet good night kiss!

Ditz don't go through a shop to get a cane rod go to the maker. Fly shops will throw a large mark up on there cause its probably in the shop on consignment. They gotta make theirs as much as the maker. Go for a single tip rod to keep the cost down. The reason for the high price tags is the work involved. Not to say that rolling a graphite or glass blank isn't work but I don't think it compares to what is done during the process of making split cane rods. Makers put their heart and soul into it, it might sound corny but you have to if its something you want to keep doing. There is countless time spent selecting the proper culm, splitting, staggering, roughing, heat treating, and planning. Measurements are taken constantly, fingers get sliced open by sharper than razor strips, hours spent waiting on varnish to dry. Then finally the maker gets to dress her up. When you spend that amount of time and put all that effort into it, it feels criminal to let one go at a bargain bin price. Its hard enough to let one go as it is! Plus that rod, if fished and properly taken care of will be around for a long long time and could end up heirloom material.

Matt its pretty challenging. In truth though if its something you're really into the work itself is no biggie but the cost and sourcing of tools is a major hurdle. Forms can go as much as 1200 block planes and Hock blades add up, bevelers are exspensive if you decide to use one, heat treating ovens add up, a proper binder can set you back a good amount too. Not to leave out the cost of reel seats guides, silks and finish. Its a hell of an investment up front, with not a whole lot of return, the profit lies in knowing you created something from scratch that with hope someone will enjoy the experience as much as you have.
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