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Old 03-05-2013, 07:54 AM
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Default Re: C&F Fly Boxes: Are They Worth It?

May I stray off (my own) topic and comment on MrTrout's remark above?: As I see it, something created and made in a given country and then illicitly copied somewhere else poses an ethical issue. In the case of Hardy, and appreciating that, as a Britain, you may have greater sensitivity to this than us Americans, the current "performance" crop of Hardy rods and reels are not the Hardy products of our youth. Losing their grip on the dominant US fly fishing market to the plethora of "up-start" US rod and reel makers, the ownership of the quality reel reputation that was theirs to loose was lost by terrible marketing and worse planing. They declined to keep current, relying on their excellent and beloved but staid products incompetently marketed and distributed here by Cortland Line Co. When they began to go "modern" and introduced fine, innovative reels like the Gem, then Angel for example, hardly anyone noticed. It was only when they wrested their distribution away from Cortland and incorporated Hardy North America under the able leadership of an experienced American that things turned an abrupt corner. It was Hardy here that initiated an advanced technology/design Zenith/Proaxis SINTRIX line of rods to be built very well but affordably by using a particular high tech, two generation rod fabricating shop in Korea. Of course great Hardy designer, Howard Croston, was an integral and brilliant component of these rods (and reels) but they were conceived from the get-go to be Korean-built. I have no issue with this scenario though the old fashioned part of me would rather they were built in England or America but the contemporary reality is there is a division of labor here that yields the best from each contributing national culture to a terrific product. One US talent is for marketing and for those among us that consider George Anderson's Shootouts as not particularly relevant; Zenith may merely have been an also-ran had Anderson not screamed from the roof tops that this new Hardy was the best trout rod on the Planet (and he didn't even sell them at that time).
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