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Old 03-12-2013, 03:10 PM
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Default Re: a few simple stonefly nymphs

Quote:
Originally Posted by diamond rush View Post
Thanks for sharing! I've been using a simple black hare's ear with a lead core to simulate the early black stoneflies around here. You've give me some good ideas on how to better match the hatch.
To be clear on what both silvertip and I are discussing, when fishing stonefly nymphs, there is no "hatch to match."

Stoneflies are predator nymphs that crawl along the rocks all the way out of the water where the winged "adult" breaks out of its exoskeleton. The wings uncurl and dry in the sun and then they take flight. It's pretty cool to watch and easy to find happening during a big hatch of salmonflies, they are usually all over the stream side vegetation.

So your hare's ear nymph is actually a great imitation of a stonefly nymph, make them black, brown and light natural hare's ear - which is a really excellent match to the many light colored stone nymphs.

---my friend told me that the nymphs cant actually swim...so tying the droppers on to the hook curve wasnt so good an idea because the nymph would flow through the water more evenly , not natural.----

silvertip: they may not swim but they do drift. Most all nymphs release from the bottom and drift at specific times each day. Ask you entomologist friend, but I believe it is natures way of dispersing a species. It is known as "behavioral drift" and Gary LaFontaine witnessed and studied it. He developed a stonefly nymph to imitate the posture of the natural by weighting the abdomen of the fly and making the thorax with spun and clipped deer hair for bulk and buoyancy. This way the fly drifts tail down, head up like a natural. And the opposite of the ubiquitous and accepted beadhead! Try it out, easy to tie, nothing fancy, and it works. I like the pattern a lot.
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