View Single Post
  #21 (permalink)  
Old 03-20-2013, 08:41 PM
Guest1's Avatar
Guest1 Guest1 is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Lake of the Woods/Rainy River Minnesota Canada border
Posts: 4,752
Guest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond reputeGuest1 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Turning wood for rods

Quote:
Originally Posted by rubberguy View Post
yes, there is glue on the blank (3/8") but it doesn't go all the way to the bottom of the cork. I only usually have 2 or 3 fingers on the bottom end, guess I must not be pulling in correctly.
By "pulling in" I'm going to assume you are Scandi casting. And by "there is glue on the blank (3/8") but it doesn't go all the way to the bottom of the cork" I'm going to assume the hole in the cork goes farther than the blank does.

Assuming I assumed right, and I assume I assumed right...... I'm sorry, I got carried away there. But assuming I did, I think you have two things working together to make for the problem you have.

When you build the butt section of the rod you start with the bottom grip. It should have been placed all the way through except the last " or so. Just enough to hide the end of the blank. This is especially important if it is meant to be underhand casted, because the cork alone is not tough enough to withstand being yanked into your gut repeatedly. They should also have glued the end of the blank better so that if you did yank the end off there should not be any exposed blank. What I believe you have there is a mistake in the build, not really what you are doing.

How far does the hole go past the end of the blank? This will make the difference between bad design and bad build. As I said the problem is fixable. If I were to do it, I would stick it in a rod lathe. Do you know anyone that has one? Go up at good inch past your glue line and cut straight down into the cork, but DO NOT HIT THE BLANK. Get close and get the rest by hand. Then get a good chunk of rubberized cork or stabilized wood. Mic the cork at the end of your cut. Turn the new piece just a tiny bit smaller than your cork where they will meet and finish it. You will have to eyeball the curvature, or you can scribe the grip as it is now on a piece if thin cardboard like you get in a shirt, using a compass. The divider looking thing with a pencil in one end. If you go to the lumber yard tell them you want a brass scribe. Cost something like $2.00. If you have never done it, PM me and I'll talk you through it. It's easy.

Have you ever scribed anything before? If not, do you know any really good finish carpenters? See, if you can scribe the shape and cut it out of a chunk of cardboard, you can perfectly match the curves of what you have right now and blend the new piece in like it was always there.

The reason I said turn the new piece just slightly smaller than the original end, is so you can turn the softer cork down to the harder wood with fine sandpaper and make the joint perfect.

I would also make the new piece a tad shorter so the blank makes it pretty close to the end, that or find a rod builder or busted rods, and get some blank chunks and build the end of the blank back out to where it should be. It doesn't have to be pretty because you are just going to bury it anyway.
Reply With Quote