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Old 03-21-2013, 02:59 PM
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Default Re: Vise Short List what to pick

Here's what's MOST important when you buy a vise--that it holds the hooks well and gives you the range of hooks either standard with those jaws or with add ons for the size flies you tie. Any of the models you're considering are going well made. My experience looking at vises in the $200/250 and up range has been that you're paying for extra machining, anodizing, design, etc. If that's worth it to you, go for it. What lead me to the Peak was that I wanted an upgrade to a rotary vise without breaking the bank and without sacrificing quality. It has other jaw options and accessories available for it which I liked. Had the Renzetti Traveler been available for a price of $160, I may have gone that route. I have no regrets about the Peak though. It's highly functional and serves my purposes well.

I do agree with flytire. If it were an option, going to a shop, tying club or whatnot to look at vises first hand and speak with other tiers is a great way to get familiar with the brands and models.

You're going to need to put some money into materials and tools, so keep that in mind as well. Not sure if you have taken that into account or not within your budget. Materials can add up FAST.
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