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Old 03-22-2013, 02:00 PM
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Default Re: Walleye patterns

I pretty much tie all of my Clousers on #2 Aberdeen hooks and bend the eye down with a pair of needle nose pliers. The reason I do this is because I like fishing snaggy spots and I can generally get my flies back if I hang them up on the bottom.

I use medium lead eyes and paint them with protec powder paint. I used to make about a third of them that glowed but as I started to see how much better they worked in everything from the end of the day low light conditions, to the darker murky stained water in one of my favorite places, it went up to half or better.

I make them as long as the bucktail I have allows them to get. As for color, if you fished Walleye alot, I am sure you know they can be a very color specific fish. Up here on the lake, the guide boats in later Summer all downrig and pull crankbaits for them. The best color can change a lot from day to day, and in fact change from one part of the day to the next. The best color for the year is rarely the same color two years in a row. I have seen days where they only wanted one color. As a general rule here though, I start with a Blue/White Clouser and go from there. The reason being that it closely approximates the main forage fish, Emerald Shiners, that we have here. The top three colors here may not be the same as where you are but mine are Blue/White (sometimes with a pink band in between in Rainbow Trout type pattern), Firetiger and all Black with no flash. I tie that with marabou so I do it better with a different style than with bucktail.

I use the same hook, same eyes but plain and don't paint them unless they are shiney silver then I paint them black. I take two feathers and clip off the ends and tie them in as the tail. I use the main portion of the feather and loop dub the fibers up the body without the stem. I use pettijon clips to do it but you can do it with any flat clip long enough to get the feather in. I like the pettijon clips because of the flat table clip. I snap the feather into it with the stem or a short piece of mono so both sides if the feather's fibers are sicking up. Then transfer it to the the narrow topped clip and trim the stem clear off. I them spin the dubbing loop and palmer it forward brushing the fibers back as I wrap. I figure 8 over the eyes to finish it. This is generally the best fly when they get onto leeches. If the Walleye do what they do here, and most people don't know about it, you should try the shallow bays around the weed edges in late August. A lot of really nice Walleye come in and target leeches. This is the pattern to go to then.

When you fish that murky water near the inlet, I have a couple of suggestions that may help you. If the inlet has any kind of rapids coming into it, you should fish the base of that really well. Especially as far up into the base as you can get. In fact when you think you are starting to get to far into the fast water, go farther. If there is a channel on the lake bottom where this inlet goes, fish the points of the channel where it hits the slope of the lake bottom. If there is a distinct current seam where it drops into the lake you should try those as well. The way I do them is cast into the current and let the water move you into the break. The fly can find it better than you can see it.

Good luck with it.
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