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Old 03-28-2013, 12:39 PM
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Default Re: Nymph fishing without indicators

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrfzx View Post
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Am I "Tacky".....maybe, but then again we all know what opinions are like.....we all have them, and they usually stink.
I hope nobody took offense at my use of the word "tacky". It was meant for my own personal sense of fly fishing aesthetics, and I stated that I don't judge another angler's program. It might not be one that I share, but as long as they're enjoying it, that's all that matters.

As far as distance and mending, go... I cast as far as I need to, and mend when mends are required. I'm not launching nymphs 70 feet, and hoping to see the tip of my line, or feel a strike transmitted from that distance, but I live in Pennsylvania. Streams are shallow and a 40 foot cast is long. I have swung GRHE's across fairly swift streams, and have had trout hit them hard. Wading into the stream isn't something I do unless it's really necessary, and staying out means greater visibility across the water. I loop the end of my fly lines to form a loop, and started using a brighter color thread to secure the loop. That makes the tip of the line more visible. I don't straighten the butt end of my leader when fishing nymphs and soft hackle flies. I'm not counting on the coil to go dead flat when I get a take, but the coil riding on top of the water aids visibility. These things are all "indicators", and the lines do get blurred to an extent. If you're using something called a Thing-a-McBobber, it's a bobber, albeit a lighter bobber that can be cast with a fly rod.

I used Cortland stick-on indicators for one season, and mostly at the local stocked lake. Takes were light when the water was cold, and even stripping Wooly Buggers yielded the lightest of takes (they'd lightly nip a couple of times, and you had to pause for the actual take). As I walked around the lake, I noticed that my little bright colored indicator looked identical to the Power Bait that everyone else was using there. Call me a snob, but I wanted people to know that I was fly fishing, and off came the indicators. I was fishing that lake from my canoe to too long after that decision, and saw a kid catching trout hand over fist with Power Bait. A piece of the dough drifted past my canoe, and I tied on a green Copper John that matched the Power Bait nicely. One cast, and I had a trout on my line! I can be a snob, but I'm an adaptable snob who recognizes that matching the dough hatch is worthy of any angler.
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