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Old 03-31-2013, 12:23 PM
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Default Re: Let's Talk About Knives.....................

Quote:
Originally Posted by ausablebrown View Post
I've got a knife with some asymetrical bevels on it. First of all, why would they do that? There is one side of the blade where the sharpened edge is barely noticable; probably less than 1/64 in. of a bevel. The other side is beveled much further up the blade. It is probably 1/32 or larger of a beveled face. So the cutting edge is not directly under the center of the blade's thickness; it sits almost entirely to one side of the blade. Is there one way to sharpen this blade better than another? And I really can't figure out why it was done that way. Anyone have an explanation, and know how to sharpen this?
Thanks for the bump fysh

Jason,

I've had ample time to consider your question and since the sharpening pro has not revisited this topic I'll offer up my second opinion here. If a blade as fine as a pocket knife were to have matching bevels it would indeed be sharp but........... and this is an important 'but'. The edge would be very sharp however it would be fragile also. the actual edge will be too thin for it to be resilient to continued use. The business of using asymmetrical bevels produces what (for lack of a better phrase) I will call an 'axe edge'. Because the second bevel or as you put it, the one edge that is barely noticeable is the one that gives the knifes edge both sharpness and longevity.

A razor is very sharp but the blade will dull quickly when subjected to heavy cutting while a knife such as a Benchmade Griptillian is meant for continued heavy cutting duty. This heavy cutting duty is why I believe the majority of blades meant for field use possess the uneven or asymmetrical bevels at their edges.

Hows that?
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