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Old 04-26-2013, 03:31 PM
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Default Re: How is Rio Grande different than just over lining?

I had a free preview of a bunch of outdoor channels a couple of months ago on TV. I was watching a fly fishing show, but only paying about half attention, when I hear during a commercial "Our line is a full weight heavier that the industry standard." After I got done choking , I run itnto the livingroom to see who would use "afull line weight heavier" and "industry standard" in the same sentence, But I missed the culprit. I have heard people say this is to load fast rods. Ahhhhhh no.

The problem is that there is a confusion that fast and weight are related, they are not, hence the TWO terms.

Many real distance casters like the rod to be well over the line weight. i.e. a 5 wt. line on a rod with a 7 ERN. (ERN being what the rod really is in wt.) So if you have a designer that really is into distance casting he is likely going to design a fast 7 wt. he calls a 5. I doubt that there was a single rod in most competitions that use a 5 wt. to do it, that had any rods there that were actually a 5 wt. They all said 5 on them but I can slap a label on a chicken that calls it a duck and that does not make him a duck. The reason being is that they carry a lot of line in the air and a 7 will load with a 5 line when you have a carry of something like 80'.

Not to beat a dead horse, but you really ought to check and see what your rod really is before you go deciding on forking out a bunch of money on a line. You also need to decide how you are going to use it. Also if the danged line companies are going to start an arms race in misinforming us what a line weighs because the rod makers do it, we are going to have to get a grain scale and a sack of new pennies and test everything, completely disregarding everything from the line and rod makers.

Also with lines, you are only talking about the first 30 feet. I have single hand lines with heads as long as 70' + on them. This line will behave differently than a line the same weight but a 40" head, once you get a lot of line carried in the air.

I know this seems like a lot to take in for a beginner (no single person in mind here) and it's kind of a shame. They should add to the labels of lines the head length, total head weight, and stick to the industry standard for the first 30', also on the label, so we don't have to guess.

Also, all rods have a grain window. That is the weight, top end and bottom end that a rod can work within. The grain window is large on a single hand rod, being quite forgiving. In a two hander it is much less forgiving with a much narrower grain window. One reason why two hand guys use the grain window of the rods, not the weight so much, and use the total head length and weight. Something that would not be that bad to do with any rod.
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