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Old 04-27-2013, 08:42 PM
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Default Re: How is Rio Grande different than just over lining?

Quote:
Originally Posted by duker View Post
Thanks Dan. I found your thread on rod weights right after I posted my question--should have searched first. Will your method work with Canadian pennies?

As I said earlier, I'm suspicious of over-lining but I guess I should use your method to determine the ERNs for my rods to at least make sure I'm using lines that are within the proper range.

Scott
You can get a very accurate scale and do a conversion. How good are the Canadian mint at uniformly making penny blanks?

Another thing you could do is use any weight you have handy, dimes nickles whatever, wiegh that when you get the rod bent to the right point and wiegh it, then divide it by whatever they say a penny weighs in the link.

Hey, maybe you can do a CN/US chart when you figure it out. I'll do some research and find out what CN pennies weigh.

I just looked and like ours, it depends on the year. Use the one you think makes the easiest conversion and stick to a single weight. Here is the chart;
If you use 1982-1996 CN pennies with no corrosion, it is a 1:1 swap.

Years

Mass

Diameter/Shape

Composition



2000-present *

2.35 g

19.05 mm, round

94% steel, 1.5% nickel, 4.5% copper plated zinc



1997-1999 *

2.25 g

19.05 mm, round

98.4% zinc, 1.6% copper plating



1982-1996

2.5 g

19.1 mm, 12-sided

98% copper, 1.75% tin, 0.25% zinc



1980-1981

2.8 g

19.0 mm, round

98% copper, 1.75% tin, 0.25% zinc



1978-1979

3.24 g

19.05 mm, round

98% copper, 1.75% tin, 0.25% zinc



1942-1977

3.24 g

19.05 mm, round

98% copper, 0.5% tin, 1.5% zinc



1920-1941

3.24 g

19.05 mm, round

95.5% copper, 3% tin, 1.5% zinc



1876-1920

5.67 g

25.4 mm, round

95.5% copper, 3% tin, 1.5% zinc



1858-1859

4.54 g

25.4 mm, round

95% copper, 4% tin, 1% zinc

Unit of mass utilized in the CCS, composed of a common U.S. one cent piece minted after the year 1996. Each of which has the mass of 38.61 grains or 2.50 grams. This gives you a method for conversion to Canadian pennies.

Last edited by Guest1; 04-27-2013 at 09:08 PM. Reason: add stuff
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