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Old 04-27-2013, 09:05 PM
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Default Re: Rod weights and Common Cents

I was just asked if it was OK to use Canadian pennies.

Unit of mass utilized in the CCS, composed of a common U.S. one cent piece minted after the year 1996. Each of which has the mass of 38.61 grains or 2.50 grams.

By using pennies from Canada that are like you would use if using US pennies, shiney and all from one weight series, you can convert the system to Canadian. Here is the weight chart for Canadian pennies:

Years Mass Diameter/Shape Composition



2000-present * 2.35 g 19.05 mm, round 94% steel, 1.5% nickel, 4.5% copper plated zinc



1997-1999 * 2.25 g 19.05 mm, round 98.4% zinc, 1.6% copper plating



1982-1996 2.5 g 19.1 mm, 12-sided 98% copper, 1.75% tin, 0.25% zinc



1980-1981 2.8 g 19.0 mm, round 98% copper, 1.75% tin, 0.25% zinc



1978-1979 3.24 g 19.05 mm, round 98% copper, 1.75% tin, 0.25% zinc



1942-1977 3.24 g 19.05 mm, round 98% copper, 0.5% tin, 1.5% zinc



1920-1941 3.24 g 19.05 mm, round 95.5% copper, 3% tin, 1.5% zinc



1876-1920 5.67 g 25.4 mm, round 95.5% copper, 3% tin, 1.5% zinc



1858-1859 4.54 g 25.4 mm, round 95% copper, 4% tin, 1% zinc

If you use 1982-1996 CN pennies with no corrosion, it is a 1:1 swap.
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