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Old 05-02-2013, 08:38 PM
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Default Re: Any headache saving tips for a new tyer? (besides don't start the addiction)

Welcome to the sickness. A few random thoughts, I'm sure there are some things I've left out that others will mention.

From one Peak owner to another, I think you'll be very happy with it. Mine has treated me very well for nearly 5 years. Learn to use the rotary feature for flies that require tight wraps. Think Copper Johns. It's still good to learn to tie without the rotary though, there are circumstances where I prefer wrapping by hand over using the rotary feature.

Get yourself a couple of different scissors. Anvil Ice are good and sharp and the Slick's with the Arrow point are good for intricate work. I have the tungsten carbides and they're a dream. There are "better" scissors out there but I just buy new ones when I need them and use the older ones to cut synthetics and wire. A cheap pair of scissors from a craft store will be fine for cutting synthetics to start with.

Bobbins, go with a couple of the ceramic lined ones. If you want to wrap wire bodied flies, get the metal lined ones exclusively for that purpose.

A pail of nail clippers works wonders when you're cutting material close to the hook shank.

I prefer a Martarelli style whip finisher. Get to know how to use one, it will pay off later. Half hitches work just fine for the most part, but I prefer a whip finish.

Sally Hansen's Hard as Nails is a great head cement. Cheap and readily available in most pharmacies.

Buy materials and tools as you need them. There's no reason to over buy to start with. That being said, figure out what you want to start tying and buy those materials. Tie a dozen or more at a time until you get the hang of that pattern, then move on. Save those flies and watch your progress.

I like Ard's suggestion: take tying classes. In 10 years of tying, I took one class and it was the most I've ever learned. I was self taught before the days of the youtube videos. While the videos are great, nothing for me compared to hands on instruction. The basics you will learn will greatly reduce your learning curve.

Last but not least, don't underestimate the power of the tying forum here. There are a ton of great tiers who have inspired, influenced and helped me out along the way. Post up your ties and your problems and I've no doubt you'll get help. We have a super thread going "What have you been tying today" that you should post pictures to once you get going. If nothing else, it's worth your time to browse through.

Good luck and enjoy it!
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