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Old 05-03-2013, 08:58 AM
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Default Re: Holiday Inn Express Guide to Macro Study

Quote:
Originally Posted by silvertip8k View Post

my question is this...are we looking for passive bugs...ones just streaming down with the current(which is what I have always done)...or by breaking up the stones etc and helping them out...is it the same really??
That would depend on what you're goal is I suppose. If sampling the overall insect population then you will need to overturn rocks and kick up some gravel. If searching for exactly what's happening in the invertebrate drift, then some type of anchored drift sock or screen would serve you better. Gary LaFontaine goes into great detail on this in his book Caddisflies.


Quote:
Originally Posted by silvertip8k View Post

I always thought some bugs were just better at hiding out...and that they were most vulnerable when they actually hatched??(or on their way to doing it)

nymphs broken loose from their moorings are what I thought we were mimicking??
Most mayfly species are exposed and drifting for days prior to hatching. Nature's way of spreading things out. Going back to that Meet the Hendrickson's video, where the nymph wiggles to the surface and then drifts back down… all Ephemerella species go through this same false emergence for days prior to – and throughout – their hatching period. That's why a simple Pheasant-tail Nymph drifted 18-24" below a small indicator is so deadly during Hendrickson and Sulphur (PMD) hatch periods.

Other species hatch on the stream bottom (Epeorus) and float to the surface before breaking through and flying away, and this is where your winged wet fly will outfish a floating dry 10:1.

Some species (Isonychia) are terrific swimmers and you can (actually should) fish the nymph cross stream with short twitches.

Trout key on areas of vulnerability during heavy hatches. That's all part of cracking the code when you see surface activity; are they taking nymphs near the surface, emergers, floating duns, cripples, spent spinners, or ignoring them all together and chasing caddis pupae?

Caddis are a whole other animal.
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