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Old 05-03-2013, 11:55 PM
silver creek silver creek is online now
 
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Location: Wisconsin
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Default Re: Casting into the wind

There are several strategies for casting into the wind and some have been mentioned before. The solutions are easy to figure out if you know what the problem is. The way to approach this is to ask yourself why casting into the wind is so difficult.

The answer is obviously aerodynamic drag. The wind creates greater drag on the fly line which slows down the cast. Slowing down the cast means it cannot travel as far. Simple right?

So how can we cast further? Obviously we can try to:

1. Decrease the drag by:

a. Increasing the line weight. Fly line is a cylinder and for a cylinder, mass goes up faster that surface area. So mass goes up more than drag on the exposed surface. So the first strategy is to use a heavier line weight. If you are casting a 5 wt rod, use a 6 wt floating line rather than a 5 wt floating line. Or better yet, go up both in rod and line weight to a a 6 or 7 wt system.

b. Casting a tighter loop. Less frontal surface area means less drag so practice tight loops.

2. Increase the energy of the cast by:

a. Double hauling. Faster velocity = more energy and momentum to overcome the drag. The cast will go father.

b. Go to a longer fly rod. A longer fly rod gives you longer casting lever and increased tip speed. Most people can cast further with a longer fly rod and being able to a longer cast longer without the wind will result in a longer cast into the wind.

3. Preserve the energy of the cast by:

a. Using an shorter leader with a more rapid taper and a shorter tippet. This type of leader preserves the energy so the entire leader will extend. You need to balance the this the need to get a good drift of the fly.

4. Overcome the drag by using the physical properties of wind. Wind blows slower near the water.

Click the image to open in full size.

a. So use an up angled backcast and a low angled forward cast. Your backcast will be aided by the wind and you can use this enhanced backcast to drive your forward cast at a downward trajectory where there is less wind.

b. When casting into the wind, shoot line into the backcast rather than into the forward cast. Use the haul on the forward cast to increase line velocity to fully extend the fly line. Only when you can fully extend that forward cast into the wind without it collapsing should you even try to extend more line against the wind.

c. Use the Reverse Belgian Cast with an oval constant tension cast that is overhead and back and then a sidearm forward cast close to the water to cheat the wind.

d. Use a sidearm cast so both limbs of the cast stay "under the wind".

Your most powerful cast should be the one you use against the wind. So in my view, unless your backcast is stronger than your forward cast, I would not turn around to use my backcast to deliver the fly into the wind.
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Regards,

Silver



"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

Last edited by silver creek; 05-04-2013 at 09:34 AM.
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