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Old 05-14-2013, 06:00 PM
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Default Re: Any headache saving tips for a new tyer? (besides don't start the addiction)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardyreels View Post
I just love to see these type of posts!

You have the proper attitude and are quite correct about this whole thing being a life long education. I've been at this for a while and although I never really 'mastered' tying flies, I've found the intrinsic value of a fly by creating them. There are other things that can deliver an equal feeling of accomplishment; wood working and many other crafts come to mind. However, fly tying connects at a much more intimate lever to another life long pursuit than some others perhaps and that is sitting along a beautiful trout stream with a totally blank mind. No worries, no stress, just you and the sights and sounds.

I'll be watching for your postings of the flies.

Ard
Love your post too Ard.
Makes one think they've found their home on the internet.

To Finisher, I would second the proportioning tip. Fly tying is all about the geometry of life, in some cases exaggerating it. The cigar shape, the elongated cone, evenly segmented bodies, hackle length, and wise use of the hook space are all things I try to keep in mind. As mentioned already, use as few wraps of the thread as possible.
Pay attention to the details from the start and it will pay dividends in the long run.

Oh one more tip: I like to draw out my dubbin to longer skinnier lengths. Build up the body slowly with more wraps. It will hold the dubbin more securely as well as give the opportunity to get the body shape right.

Have fun
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