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Old 05-15-2013, 04:32 AM
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Default Re: Single hand spey casting

I've read this prior to posting and trust you will not view what I say as criticism, I am just relating some thoughts based on my own practices & experience.

I only see one thing that makes me curious.

While I agree that the casting is smooth, you are using a lot of back space. Let me clarify what I mean by that; I took up Spey style casting with both single & 2 hand rods because of one important need. That 'need' was to eliminate the need for back cast space. Many situations in fly fishing (wet fly and streamers) present the problem of not having sufficient space for standard over head fly casting. A 45 foot forward cast & presentation requires at least 20 - 25 foot of clear space to the rear for your back cast. Many areas I have fished and currently fish in do not offer this much or more space for back casting. Thus the Spey cast, but I cast without the need to place any anchoring line to my rear. All anchors are placed to my upstream shoulder regardless of which side I face the rivers flow from. By doing so, I am able to reach great distances on a forward cast reaching either strait across or slightly up stream from my position with virtually no open space to my rear.

I should go on to say that this style casting I have never found conducive to fishing dry flies. When fishing the dry you have much more latitude on where you can be at in the stream channel. Because most dry fly fishing is accomplished with an upstream presentation, one can sometimes fish their way up a stream wading in the channel and casting to fish above their position that are visibly feeding on the surface.

The wet or streamer fly is much different presentation wise. We generally move in a downstream direction and seek to stay out of the stream channel as much as possible. The fish we seek are not visible and we need to consider that they may be anywhere within the streams banks. The closer to shore you are the better to cover the water with the swinging fly and to search for those hidden fish. Here is where the Spey cast will shine! With hardly more than a few feet between your back and the trees & brush you can fish very effectively.

If I have enough room to my rear to cast in the way I see you doing on the video, I would probably use my standard over head casting techniques unless I were using a 2 hand rod.

Ard
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