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Old 05-20-2013, 01:20 PM
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Default Re: green drake emerger pattern

Quote:
Originally Posted by dean_mt View Post

And also some of us fishing the drunella, apparently. Drastically different to entomologists but maybe similar to fisherman? :-) a very big and greenish mayfly to the layman, and hard to match?
The main reason I prefer the scientific names (versus the common names) other than the point illustrated above, is that it narrows down the subtleties of the specific insect.

Case in point - Drunella species; All Drunella's (D. lata, D. cornuta, D. flavilinea, D. doddsi, etc) change colors dramatically when they hatch. They tend to hatch in the surface film and then pop through the meniscus (like most Ephemerella species). A freshly-hatched Drunella actually has a bright green (chartreuse) body, but within moments of riding on top of the water and being exposed to air their body dries to a medium/dull olive.

So depending on how much emphasis is placed on body color, an emerger pattern for Drunella hatches (aka Western Green Drakes, Eastern Blue-winged Olives, Flav's in the west) should be dressed in bright green.

For example, when the D. cornuta's were hatching on the Brodhead River back in PA, this was a killer flymph pattern. I tie them on yellow thread to bring out the green even more than shown here.
Click the image to open in full size.
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