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Old 07-25-2013, 01:09 PM
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calftail calftail is offline
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Default Re: Flash flood possiblity in river Canyon?

Be careful !

You do need to be aware that afternoon thunderstorms in the mountain regions will dump a lot of water in a hurry. In 1976 I was fishing in Cheesman Canyon and was alerted to rising water because I heard a change in the sound of the river. I told my brother.."let's get out of here". We packed up and were on the rim of the canyon and I watched as a straight wall of brown muddy water rolled behind overtaking the normally clear flow ahead of it. It was a chilling sight. We hiked to the car and still hadn't felt a drop of rain, but that changed after driving about 2 miles toward home. The rain came down so heavy I couldn't see past the hood. I pulled over and we sat in the deluge for 15 min..

The radio was warning of flash flood potential across the Front Range.

That afternoon it happened. The Big Thompson Flood. The flood killed over 130 people and obliterated everything in it's path. The normal flow for The Big Thompson is about 90 cfs. When the flood came down the Thompson Canyon the estimated flow was 32,000 cfs. All I could do was shake my head in disbelief.

Check this out....it happened a weeks ago in Waldo Canyon...http://gazette.com/video-flash-flood...rticle/1503346

I have a deep respect for what the weather can do in mountains and canyons. My advice is to fish as early as you can and plan on heading home at 10-11 o'clock to beat the storms.

Last edited by calftail; 07-25-2013 at 01:12 PM. Reason: add
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