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Old 07-26-2013, 11:57 AM
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Default Re: Fluorocarbon tippet - different than fluorocarbn line?

Quote:
Originally Posted by smarty140 View Post
I've searched through some of the older threads discussing fluorocarbon tippets, and have a question I didn't see discussed: Is there a difference (other than packaging) between fluorocarbon tippet sold specifically for flyfishing and the larger spools of fluorocarbon line sold for spin fishing? I'm seeing more and more fluorocarbon line for sale in outdoor stores around here, I think mostly for walleye fishing. The 100-150 yard spools are about the same price as a spool of fluoro tippet.

So... for the same diameter / strength, is there a functional difference, or is it just that those larger spools are too big to fit in a vest and companies know that us flyfishermen tend to be willing to spend quite a bit of $ on our sport than others? Is there a difference in in flexibility, toughness, etc, assuming we're comparing reputable brands? I'm pretty sure I've got some empty tippet spools that I could rewind with 30 yards off a 100 yard spool if that's all it takes...

Thanks in advance for sharing your knowledge!

ryan
That really is the difference. Fly line manufacturers are building leader materials that are much thinner and stronger than their conventional line company counterparts. Rio's Fluoroflex Plus, Umpqua Superfluoro, Seaguar Grand Max 2x material have a diameter of .009" and are rated around 12 pound test. Various conventional line companies .009" diameter lines average around 6 pound test. It is also interesting to know that the strength ratings to diameter are different between Seaguar fluorocarbon lines versus its own fly fishing leader materials.

The reason for the high cost of fluorocarbon tippets is due to building a higher quality product and economy of scale. There is a bit more engineering in a leader material that is stronger in thinner diameters but retains the suppleness to make nice presentations. Also the economy of scale is going to favor the conventional line companies. They are just going to pump out more line.

Here's a warning. Be very careful mixing conventional fluoro material with fluoro tapered leaders. Knot strength will be greatly reduced.

Dennis
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