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Old 07-27-2013, 01:17 PM
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Default Re: "Dunkable" 8wt. Fly Reel?

My Abels have been dunked in saltwater many times. Water does not affect the performance of the drag, since it is cork creating friction against the flat aluminum underside of the spool. There's no room for water to get between the cork and the spool with the drag set properly. Cork naturally repels liquid, which is why it is used in wine bottles to seal in the good stuff.

There's also no porting around the face of the drag or underside of the spool to allow anything in there to interfere with the drag performance. This applies to both solid frame reels or ported reels.

If you get sand in your reel, it will only be between the frame and spool, which could happen on ANY reel. just dunk it and rinse the sand out, and then get back to the fish.

Abels are made of anodized aircraft-grade aluminum and stainless steel. There are no plastic parts and nothing for saltwater to ruin. They are purposely built to withstand years of use in tough conditions whether salt or fresh water.

Another reel that I rarely see mentioned is the Ross Momentum LT. I have the older version of the Momentum, and it performs great in the salt water as well.

Dunk away! It will not affect performance of a good quality reel that's built for the salt.

-VB

---------- Post added at 11:17 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:51 AM ----------

Abel reel deconstructed:

A lot has been said about the virtues of solid frames vs. ported frames and sealed drags vs. other types.

This should provide a visual of what's going on inside the cork drag of an Abel.

Essentially, solid frame or ported frame is a matter of cosmetic preference and weight more than anything else.

The drag itself is the same, and the surfaces at work with the drag are not affected by whether the reel is ported or solid.

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A sealed drag requires no maintenance. However, it also cannot be maintained by the user if something fails inside. The cork drag itself is sealed. Nothing can get between the cork and aluminum face when you're fishing, unless you introduce abrasive debris between the two when you have the reel apart for maintenance.

I primarily fish in the surf, so I am standing in beach sand and in just a couple of feet of water, so I am more likely to get sand in my reel than someone fishing offshore or inshore flats or bays. I've dunked my reels and they've landed in the sand many times. However, the sand cannot affect the drag operation itself, but can get between the spool and frame edges, which you will see and feel very quickly. Every fly reel is susceptible to this whether the drag is sealed or not.

A solid frame reel will not prevent grit from coming between the spool and frame if it lands in the sand.

I hope this helps provide a visual perspective of the simplicity of the inner workings of Abel Super Series reels. By the way, the bearings are sealed and contained within the hub of the spool.

Cheers,

-VB
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