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Old 08-21-2013, 12:30 PM
bigjim5589 bigjim5589 is offline
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Default Re: Why strip strike?

Good discussion. IMO, a strip strike allows the most direct application of power to the hook. When the rod is pointed at the fly, and you're retrieving line, there will be slight amounts of slack. But since everything is basically in-line, the strip strike removes that slack quickly, and as others said, provides direct & quick setting of the hook.

Raising the rod, if done rather slowly, actually puts more slack in the line. (Like when roll casting.) If done quickly, that section of line between the rod tip & water, being arched will bounce, which adds to the slack. You may really be losing control of the line & fly when raising & striking with the rod. Doesn't mean you won't get a good hook set, but may cause you not to as well.

There is a certain amount of stretch in the line also. There's probably a small amount in the leader & tippet too, but not likely enough to have any impact since they're relatively short. Being in-line with a strip strike may also take advantage of that line stretch, like a bungee cord, while raising the rod, again because of the the arched line & stretch may really be adding more slack that also minimizes the power you put into the strike.

The low & to the side rod strike might be fine in some short line situations. Guys who use other tackle do that a lot. But there the rods are generally shorter & stouter, and the line diameter thinner so there's less resistance. If they're using braided lines, there's very little if any stretch. Since a fly line is larger diameter compared to lines used with other tackle, and depending on the length of line, a fast side strike with the rod may also be adding an unwanted bow in the line, which again limits the power applied to the hook.

As the math rule goes, the shortest distance between 2 points is a straight line, so goes the most direct way to apply power to a hook point, and the strip strike is the closest thing you'll get to that straight line.
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Last edited by bigjim5589; 08-21-2013 at 12:49 PM.
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