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Old 09-01-2013, 02:11 PM
silver creek silver creek is online now
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Wisconsin
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Default Re: How to fish a hopper, and some rigging questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by fiend540 View Post

It certainly does, but raises another one lol. So the way I have fished, and was shown how to rig is the dropper is attached to the hook rather than the eye to eye like is pictured. Is their an advantage of one over the other?

Both methods have problems.

Attaching the dropper to the hook bend means the fish has to take the dropper tippet into his mouth if the fish is to take the top fly.

The problem with tying the dropper to the hook eye is that this is hard to do when the hook eye already has the a leader tied to it. Threading a second tippet through the eye can be problematic if the top fly is a small one.

Both of the above methods have a second problem. By tying the dropper directly to the the top fly whether at the eye OR at the hook bend, the top fly CANNOT move naturally. It is affixed to the bottom fly and this restricts the motion of the top fly.

In Physics there is a concept called degrees of freedom. Any object in that 3 dimensional space has 6 degrees of freedom which that are important:

Up or down in the water column
Side to side in the water
Downstream or Upstream

It has 6 others that are less important, (it can spin right or left, it can spin up or down, it can vibrate side to side or up and down)

An object that is attached above and below is restricted.

I place each of my flies on droppers. So each fly moves independently of the other. And each fly has the hook unencumbered by a tippet. There is a reason that the English fish their "brace" of wet flies each on a dropper. Each fly has the most freedom to move as it can and still be attached to the deader by a dropper.

Click the image to open in full size.

There are multiple ways to rig a dropper system. Here are a few.

Blood knot dropper

Click the image to open in full size.

Loop knot dropper

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Loop to loop droppers:

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

Tippet ring droppers

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Click the image to open in full size.


PM me if you need tippet rings.
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Regards,

Silver



"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

Last edited by silver creek; 09-01-2013 at 04:57 PM.
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