View Single Post
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 09-15-2013, 09:40 AM
silver creek silver creek is online now
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,311
silver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Double hauling destroys my cast

Quote:
Originally Posted by zhaddock View Post
I still get a slight tailing loop when I haul but, not when casting without a haul. I'll keep working on it. I was able to drop my line within a foot of a horse shoe post from about 60' out 8 out of 10 times so I'm pretty happy with my progress so far.
A tailing loop is when the fly leg and the rod leg of the casting loop cross each other and get tangle. For this to occur, the back cast and forward cast must be performed in the same geometric plane.

By using an elliptical casting motion, the back cast and forward cast are made in different planes and this separates the two legs of the loop formation. Even if the upper and lower legs of the loop formation cross vertically, they cannot catch on each other because they are separated horizontally in space. The line cannot catch itself because they are in different planes.

To see how this works, make a side ward back cast and then an overhead forward cast and you will see than the two legs of the loop are in different planes. Even if the upper leg of the loop drops down because of a concave path on the forward stroke, there is no lower leg of the loop to get tangle with because there is a horizontal separation of the two legs of the loop.

This type of cast us known as the Belgian Cast. Because this cast separates the planes of the back cast and forward cast, it is an excellent cast to prevent tangles not only for tailing loops but also when casting multiple flies or heavily weighted flies. It is also an excellent wind cast when your back is to the wind and it often called the Belgian Wind Cast for this reason.
__________________
Regards,

Silver



"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy
Reply With Quote