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Old 09-30-2013, 01:40 PM
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Default Re: Tube Flies for GL's Steelhead

Hey King Joe,

Like you had mentioned, I'm more familiar with single hand rods and nymphing techniques but have over the past few years gotten into two handed rods.

I don't have specific patterns that I can point you to, especially since we're fishing on different sides of one of the big ponds and maybe even a different pond all together but...

I would suggest that any streamer that you tie on a shank, be it with a trailer or with a regular hook, you can do with a tube. I've been dabbling with this and am still experimenting. You can do buggers, emerald shiners, intruders, sculpins etc. Just use similar colors as you would the "traditional" pattern and you should be set. If you like more traditional salmon/spey style flies, don't be afraid to try them on a tube also. One thing about tubes that I seem to hang onto is that I'm less concerned with following the recipe to exact proportions as I am when doing them on traditional shanks. Now I'm not sure if this is just a mental note I've made to myself or if this is typical of the tube fly community. I guess my message here is go freestyle more so than ever with tubes! If you have the chance to take a class on tying on tubes in your area, by all means give it a go.

What I like about them is you can change hooks out easily, the flies generally last through many more battles, and getting them out without destroying the fly is pretty easy.

You may need to add weight to it by using a weighted tube, cone, eyes, etc to counterbalance the plastic tube. Sometimes this plays into your advantage if you don't want it to directly hit the bottom. You can of course also use T- line or ploys/MOW tips too.

Not sure what materials you have on hand but you may need to add some depending on the fly you're tying. You will also want to add an adapter to your vise to mount and tie the tubes on. These adaptors can be tricky, sometimes the ones you want are based on the type of tube you are using, or at least so I've found thus far.
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