Thread: Me or the rod?
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Old 10-11-2013, 03:48 PM
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Default Re: Me or the rod?

I have no experience with the rod in question but suspect the problem lies in your ability at this point rather than the rod. If the rod tip seems to be wobbling after the stop this would suggest that there was a lack of load and line speed.

The suggestion that the back cast may not be straightened out when you start the forward stroke is perhaps the best. Generally by the time I have stopped the forward stroke my line is traveling at the top speed. This results in it quickly unfurling with no problems.

There are different strokes for different folks. I for instance seldom make my forward stop at exactly 10 O' Clock. I tend to take the rod forward as far as needed to compensate for the length of the delivery cast. This can sometimes result in my having a very low tip position by the time the cast is down.

Your own personal style will be the result of your practice. I don't believe that there is a cookie cutter casting form that will fit every fly caster. When you consider that there are millions of us it would be impossible for everyone to be using the exact same procedure. The ten & two stroke is a good teaching tool. It gives a solid base for folks to begin their casting / learning process. Trying to adhere to it through your life's fishing experience may not give the best results.

In both single hand and 2 hand casting I do so many things that are way out of the scope of how casting is taught. However, with either type of rod if I were watched from a distance you may think I cast rather well. There are always casts that flop, those that are not picture perfect. In my opinion this is not something to worry about at all. On the other hand if the problem is chronic and affects every cast it is time to return to square one and refine your efforts. By this I mean that you may need to read again and study diagrams of a solid casting style. Take your time and be sure to comprehend the material studied and then go for some casting practice.

My own learning encompassed over ten years. It was until I put in some serious study and practice that I actually realized what good casts looked like coming from my rods.

Ard
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