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Old 10-15-2013, 09:20 AM
wjc wjc is offline
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Default Re: heavy wt. injuries

Just for grins, I just weighed a few rods, all w/lined +backed reels.

TCR 5wt w/Hardy LRH lightweight = 8.65 oz

Xi3 12 wt w/ Nautilus + G-9 spool = 16.77 oz

RPLX (modified ) w/Tibor Gulfstream = 24.7 oz

The modern 12 wt setup above is as light as you will find with that Nautilus spool and it weighs nearly twice what the trout rod weighs. The line outside the tip on the presentation cast, with unweighted fly, weighs in excess of 600 gns, so 1.4 oz of that weight has to be moving fast enough to stay aloft high enough to miss skiff, motor cowling etc., or a steeply sloping beach/sand dunes behind.

The RPLX weighs probably what a modern 15 wt setup would weigh. When tarpon fishing, I keep that one lined with a sink tip, an xi3 set up with a floating line. When sailfishing it (heavy one) has a 550 gn. floating head on it since it has ample power to cast the head with large poppers.

Casting a 12 wt with that rod (especially a sink tip) for any length of time requires good technique and muscles that are in shape - especially in the intermidible wind.

So if you plan on going to a bucket list destination for big fish, I'd recommend tuning up those muscles.
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