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Old 11-25-2013, 10:47 AM
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Default Re: Strains of Browns...Help!

There is a wonderful book, "The Complete Brown Trout", Cecil Heacox, full of fascinating history and biology about our now, but not always, beloved Salmo trutta. Bottom line is the first eyed eggs came to these shores in the mid 1800's from Loch Leven, Scotland. There is one repository of pure Loch Leven's extant and that is in a waterfall protected location in the southern portion of Yellowstone (do your own homework to find out where). These fish are characterized by not having any red spots and having larger and fewer black spots than their few years latter, Black Forest, von Behr cousins. The German fish have typically smaller and more plentifully black spots with red spots distributed along their flanks. All the browns we fish for in North America are mixtures of these two strains and can exhibit any and all combinations of color features. The degree of how buttery or bright they are I though more habitat driven but I have caught silvery fish and deeply colored ones in the same stream not far apart, so who knows. I know this, they are less prone to domestication than rainbows, live longer, grow bigger and are somehow more rewarding to fool on a dry fly. I love them.
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Last edited by sweetandsalt; 11-26-2013 at 10:19 AM.
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