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Old 12-11-2013, 07:17 AM
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Default Re: How far "should" I cast?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ts47 View Post
Thanks Jaybo. Very well said.

---------- Post added at 11:37 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:20 PM ----------

Thanks everyone for the responses! This has been a very interesting thread with a lot of very good information. I get the line control comments and have some skill with it already.

I've been reading one of Lefty Kreh's books and have downloaded the Sexyloops app onto my Ipad. The beauty of the Sexyloops app is it can travel with me. Between the trees and swing set in my yard, I've had to take my practice casting to a field behind a nearby school. Hopefully with a little work and guidance from these resources and others, I'll be able to improve my casting skills. I'm currently working on improving my stroke in general, accuracy, shooting line, the roll cast, tuck cast and of course my mending and line control on the water. These are the things I seem to use most often. I also want to learn the double haul and how to cast farther when the situation calls for it.

Aside from taking actual lessons, does anyone have a learning resource you think I should look into, aside from those already mentioned?

Todd
Line control is difficult to deal with on a lawn...its to easy. So I do line control maneuvers to help get my body into the habit...I coil line as I bring it in to allow me to shoot it out as I cast when in moving water....pulling 60 of line upstream to cast again is a pain and will get you to make a mistake.

Any fishing situation you get comfortable with on land will not be the same when you get in water. The cast is about it.

When in ideal conditions...(on a lawn with no wind) work hard on your perfect casting stroke and timing. When more or less line is out the length and dynamics of the cast do change.

Break things down into segments and work each one with a goal in mind. Keep in mind the complexity will be 10 fold in the water.
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