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Old 03-11-2014, 09:49 AM
silver creek silver creek is offline
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Default Re: double haul question

Quote:
Originally Posted by robmedina View Post

What I noticed is that when I do my back casts the haul comes at 180 degrees of the rod but on my forward cast the haul comes at about 90 degrees- if that makes any sense.

Logic told me to do the forward cast at 180 degrees too but I always go early because I feel that I am loosing the momentum if I wait any longer than I am-

Any tips on how to get that forward cast?

I can shoot line out on that last forward cast but a lot of times I get that dreaded tailing loop!

Rob


There is no way to give a correct answer to your question. I'm not even sure what the 90 degrees and 180 degrees of rod angle are since you have not set a point of reference. 90 degrees relative to what?

Secondly, the optimum timing of a double haul depends on multiple factors. Have you ever noticed that very few of the experts articles tell you exactly WHEN you should haul? Why is that?

The reason is that the timing of the haul depends on how you cast and the equipment you are using. For example, if you make a backcast so that there is some slack in your fly line as you begin you forward cast, an earlier haul that removes that slack and straightens the fly line for the forward cast might improve you forward cast more than a later haul. Why? Because with an earlier haul and a straight fly line, you don't waste stroke length removing that slack.

But if you begin your forward cast with a perfectly straight line and no waves or slack, a late haul is best because it maximizes fly line velocity right before the rod stop.

Read Al Kye's FFF article on the double haul and how the fly line and fly rod used influences when the haul is performed and how fast a haul is made.

http://www.fedflyfishers.org/Portals....Al%20Kyte.pdf


There are several possible reasons why you are getting a tailing loop with that forward cast haul. One is that you are creeping the rod forward before your forward cast. This forces you to "jab" the fly rod during the forward cast causing a tip bounce during the cast.

Another cause is that the haul is too sudden and too early. Another is that you are not tipping the rod tip out of the way at the forward stop.

See the video on fly rod creep.


Read the following on tailing loops.

throwing tailing loops like crazy

Tight, strong loops that catch the fly back on the line?
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Regards,

Silver



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