Thread: Moment of zen
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Old 08-12-2009, 07:04 AM
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Default Moment of zen

Having spent the last three weeks ernestly tying flys for an outing with a close and long time friend and my son, we packed our gear and headed off to do some summer trout fishing in the South Carolina/North Carolina mountains. I had tied sulphers, caddis and Duns in a full range of sizes. Many terestrials, black and gold stones in various sizes and patterns, wet flys and streamers. I basically had a ball with it and made up two nice fly boxes of 50 flies for both friend and son.

the weather was slightly overcast and cool, streaching the morning feed later into the day. As the afternoon came around, tempratures rose and the fish activity died. I had been fishing about a half mile from camp down the Chatooga river and the action was light but constant with three brook and two bows in the 9 - 10 inch range. the river was freshly stocked per the report and it seemed that way.

Coming back to the river from camp after getting some more water, I spot my friend and sneek to behind a tree just overlooking his fishing hole. His knees had been bothering him so he had stayed in the general 200 yards close to the camp but also had caught a handful of fish through the morning. I emediately saw his prey from my vantage point. About 6 trout, hanging in a deep trough about 20 feet down stream from him. He would cast into the fast water and was bringing a wet fly down and across but wasn't getting down into them.

I tied a #16 brassie only my line and went to give him my rod. While he fished it, I tied a fat #10 golden stone onto his line and traded his rod back to him. I returned to my overlook and settled in to watch.

His first cast was long but his second fell into the middle of that school and it was like electricity had been applied to the water. All the trout were whipping around this nymph for a half second and then out from under a rock shot a 13 inch Rainbow, took the stone and the fun shot into high gear.

After he landed and released the big rainbow I realized that the event had been a moment of zen for me. The only thing better than tying my own flys and catching fish is tying flys for others and the ensuing smiles on thier faces.

tight lines all,

JJ
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