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Old 08-17-2009, 12:04 PM
peregrines peregrines is offline
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Default Re: Please Help what is this worth

wterry-

Welcome to the board, glad to have you here.

That doesn't sound like a great set up for those species-- a long rod can be difficult to swing around on a boat, and as cliff said you'd lose a lot of leverage on a fish.

A more typical set up for big tarpon over 100 pounds would be a 9 foot long 12 weight rod matched to a high quality reel like a Tibor Gulfstream, Charleton Mako, etc that can hold 300 yds of 30lb backing.

This would be an expensive setup with limited application for other stuff if you plan on taking a few guided trips. On the other hand, if you have your own boat (or boats since tarpon are often targeted on flat skiffs, and sailfish would require something with a lot more freeboard for blue water), then a heavy outfit like a 9' 12 weight might be a good investment for tarpon, sails and occasional 100 lb tuna. Big marlin, large tuna etc would require a heavier outfit.

Tell us a little more about the fishing you plan to do--- it may be, if you're planning a trip for these species in a well established fly rod fishery, like the Keys, you'd be better off using the guide's tackle- it would usually be top of the line gear and you could avoid either sinking a ton of money into an expensive outfit or buying less expensive gear that might blow up on a fish of a lifetime. (Rods blow up all the time on these fish, I'm thinking here about the reel- because of the tremendous speed and power of these fish many reels that are fine for other species often seize up and/or blow apart).
On the other hand if you're planning to go to a more remote destination with a less well established fly fishery you might very well have to bring all your own gear--- this is something to check on before hand.

Again tell us a little bit more about the fishing you intend to do, the gear you have already, and what fishery (where) you plan to use it, and welcome to the board.


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