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Old 09-17-2009, 11:02 AM
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Hardyreels Hardyreels is offline
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Default Re: recommended line weight.

Mike,

How long is your leader? What size mono are you using?

A twelve inch fly is larger than anything I have ever cast but I do hurl large (3/0) weighted flies with a large, (pea sized) split shot on my leader. The combo I just described requires that after retrieving the fly I make a roll cast to my front, then use the friction of the water to load the rod for the back cast. When the back cast is underway I slip ten or more feet of line into it then haul the line hard and shoot as much as I can on the delivery. Don't get concerned about bending the rods, most of the potential energy held within the rod is built into the progressive taper of the rod. The more flex you put into the rod the more kinetic energy you will unleash into the cast. Harnessing that energy with proper timing and casting style is up to you as the variable in the action.

The technique I'm describing to you allows for a cast of 30 or 40 feet. For a longer cast I repeat the process as soon as the first cast lands. The second effort allows another 20 feet or so to be added to the presentation. This will 'load' your rod even harder but do not fear, the rod will handle the task. Your timing and style become even more critical to the success of the action at this time.

As for the short casts, those casts in which the leader doesn't stretch out, make a strip equal to the length of your leader as quick as you can. This puts the fly into swimming action and straitens the leader while under water. I don't consider a cast when the leader doesn't straiten out as a bad cast. There are no bad casts when you're fishing wet flies. If the fly lands in the water it is a good cast.

Ard
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Last edited by Hardyreels; 09-17-2009 at 11:05 AM. Reason: add content
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