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Old 10-30-2009, 08:43 PM
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Default Re: Spey/Switch Rods and Target Fish

I have been targeting Walleye. Last summer I started catching really big Walleye with a single hand rod. The problem with that here is though, we have really high, close banks. The river gets deep really fast. Wearing waders only gets you a few more feet of casting room. This is why I came up with the idea of the spey rod. From the sounds of it, I may be the first person to target Walleye with a spey rod. This may have a lot to do with the fact that not many people target walleye with any kind of fly rod. It has worked out really well for me too. Just this summer I have broken the Fresh Water Fishing Hall of Fame catch and release records for Walleye in the 12, 14, 16, and if my line does not under test, the unlimited tippet records. I have been fishing 8 lb. tippet, and think I have a really good shot at knocking that one off before ice as well. I broke the 10 lb. tippet last summer with my 5 wt. single hand rod. Next year I may have to go back to a single hand rod and a float tube to get the 2, 4, and 6 lb. records. The problem with light leaders and a 15 foot rod is clousers basically become free flying projectiles. Maybe a lighter switch rod? I'll have to think about it this winter. Here is a Walleye that tied the 16 lb. tippet record, but I didn't have a witness, and couldn't turn it in. I took the photo with a small tripod [5"] and a timer. The fish didn't want to cooperate, and spiked me in the chin with its dorsal fin. You can't see it in the photo, but I'm setting on a log there. It worked out OK because I got a bigger one a few days later and had the witness.
Click the image to open in full size.
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