Thread: Spey cast....
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Old 11-04-2009, 01:27 PM
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Default Re: Spey cast....

The first cast I learned was the single spey. The second was the perry poke, which drastically improved my distance with the single spey. I live on the 'river left' side of the river, so the next cast I worked on was the snap T. However, If I have a bad wind coming down the river, and the snap T being an upsteam anchor cast I needed a cast that I wouldn't whack myself with the fly. I learned to do the double spey left handed. I also do the snake rool left handed, because it works for river left and is a down stream anchor, so it keeps me from whacking myself with the fly with a stiff downstream wind. In fact, I practice with both hands everytime I go fishing. The hardest cast I learned was the Jelly Roll. It looks really cool and works for river left. I've learned the snake roll, and if I let the fly sink really well, can do a triple snake roll. I use the cackhanded snake roll quite a bit also. I've also learned the 'S' spey and the wombat. I don't really think the wombat really deserves it's own name. It's just a snap T with a perry poke tossed in.

I started spey casting just this summer. I don't have any other spey casters anywhere near me, and for sure no instructors. I learned all of this from You Tube. There is a guy named Kevin Paterson(sp?) from the river Tweed in Scotland that does a circle spey on one of his videos. Most people I think, use snap T and Circle spey as interchangeble names for the same cast. However, if you watch most people, there is a defined snap in the snap T. Kevin does a more flowing constant motion cast. I do it both ways and it works differently for me. If I do it the "snappy" snap T way with a downstream wind I get close to my self with the fly. The Kevin P circle spey style keeps it away from me. The pause at the end of the snap allows the wind to blow my D loop in close to me. I consider them two different casts. For me they are. I use them each for different reasons.

The most useful thing I figured out lately was not even a cast. When I cast with a single hand rod I use my right hand and put my left foot forward. I was doing the same thing spey casting. Then I noticed there were many of the really good casters Like Eoin Fairgrieve putting the right foot forward. I tried it and have not blown an anchor since. It keeps me from sweeping to far back when going into the start position, and from trunking my cast. Trunking may be a Scottish term, because it was a Scottish guy looking at video of me casting, accused me of it. Dropping the rod low in back. Stopping that helped a bunch. Trunking is a cast killer.

I have to disagree with flyguy66 about the snake roll being for show and not for go. This may be more true for single hand casting, but not for spey rods. When I was fishing the rapids at the Rapid River, I used a snake roll more than any other cast. It gets the line up in the air, allowing me to place my anchor where I can get a greater change of direction and loads the rod well giving me the line speed to keep the influence of the wind to a minimum. It is a very useful cast. It can be pretty "showy" as well.

I think the thing that defines most what cast should be used, is whether you want an upstream or downsteam anchor. Wind being the biggest contributing factor in where that anchor should be. On a final note, once you get the spey casting figured out you will find it is much less fatigueing than single hand casting. You may just be trying to hard. One of the best pieces of advice I was given was "slow down"

Last edited by Guest1; 11-04-2009 at 02:01 PM.
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