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Old 04-18-2010, 06:35 AM
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Default Re: Classic New Zealand Streamers

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisinselwynNZ View Post
The split partridge

Hook- 2-6
Tail- died cock
Rib- oval
Body- wool or chenille
Wing- split partridge tail
Hackle- brown
Cheeks- jungle cock nails
Head- black

Ill do a step by step for this one as some people may not have seen this style of tying before

1 tie in the tail and rib wind the thread to the shoulder (you don't need to be too pickey because wool is prity forgiving)

Click the image to open in full size.

2 tie the wool in at this point (thin it 2 strands for #2 hook) wind it to the tail and back and tie off use no more than 3 wraps.

Click the image to open in full size.

3 rough the wool up, and tie the wing in (the partridge tail that you split and matched it is best if there is as little as posable of the feathers spine left it will tie in better) give it plenty of wraps (you will remove most of them latter) this is important so the wing dosnt move while you tie it down with the rib

Click the image to open in full size.

4 pull on the tip of the wing so the spine rests along the body of the fly, use you bodkin to split the feather where the rib is going to pass through, from this point on dont let pressure off the wing or it will look bad

Click the image to open in full size.

5 as you wind the rib forward separate the feather where the rib will pass through until you reach the head

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6 when you reach the head with the rib undo the wraps around the butt of the feather and leave 2-3 and tie off the rib tidy the wing up stroke it back too fill the gaps back in (see in this one that the feather has a bow in it because I let go to photograph it halfway along)

Click the image to open in full size.

7 tie in the hackle fibers as even as you can for the throat and cover the base of the wing leave space for the jungle cock nails, tie the nails in and finish the head and varnish I did two flies as the first had a poor rib because I let go to photograph it

the finished fly

Click the image to open in full size.

This was one of the flies that people came up with when It was made illegal to fish with Bittern and Kiwi flies (endangered native spicies) you cant even possess thease feathers now or import skins (Bittern) the Moari name for Bittern is Matuku which is how these flies were tied and the method that is still used today but with rooster feathers binding the feather to the shaft of the hook if the feather is no longer than twice the length of the hook then the feather will fowl very seldom. the Split partridge was one of the transition flies that lasted the longest because it is a great fly it only stoped being used because 40 years ago the partridge tails were hard to get and the ones you could get cost a small fortune.

Chris
Chris,

That split partridge is a very unusual pattern; I've never seen anyone split the barbs on a wing with the ribbing before. Nice way to keep the wing tight to the body; which is sometimes a problem with streamers that have a large or a stiff wing. In the water, I've always thought that a wing that's tight to the body does a better job of attracing fish; unless the wing is very flexible, as with most of the hairwing patterns or the hairwing adaptations of the featherwing patterns.

I really like your older patterns; both from a fishing standpoint and from an historical standpoint.

Keep 'em comin'!

Which one do you like best so far?

Pocono
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