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Old 04-20-2010, 08:12 AM
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ChrisinselwynNZ ChrisinselwynNZ is offline
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Default Re: Classic New Zealand Streamers

Thanks Pocono, I tie that one with just the feather too and its still very efective

Craigs Nightime

First tied by Eric Craig in 1930

Hook- 2-8
Tag- red wool
Rib- silver
Body- Black wool or mohair
Wing- pukeko blue breast feathers (tied pukeko style)
Throat- black cock
Wing over- 1 jungle cock nail (newer tie had yellow dyed cock)

I have done a step by step for this fly too as its only common in New Zealand

1 tie in tag, rib, and form body and rib the fly.

Click the image to open in full size.

2 Tie 2 pukeko feathers in covering the tag with the tips of the feather crossing

Click the image to open in full size.

3 Tie another set of feathers on top of these ones to get a v shape over the body these are not tied as long as the last ones.

Click the image to open in full size.

4 tie in one last pair of feathers not quite as long again.

Click the image to open in full size.

5 Tie the throat in and the jungle cock nail on top to finnish the fly and varnish the fly (once the fly gets wet the wing will cling to the body and look much nicer)

Click the image to open in full size.

The finnished fly

Click the image to open in full size.

This is recognised as the first fly to use Pukeko feathers and is still in use today (most tackle shops will have some if its an area that has the oppertunity for night fishing)the jungle cock was always the first to go on these flies this was replaced by yellow cock barbs, which was also dropped for the pattern in use today.

Eric Craig was the first to tie this pattern and was walking the banks of an Auckland river when he came across a dead Pukeko so he lifted some feathers and tied and fished it that night with good sucesses.

Chris
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