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Old 06-19-2010, 04:11 PM
peregrines peregrines is offline
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Default Re: Issues with new line

ip107 welcome to the forum, hope you enjoy it here. We have a lot of good folks that can help you get started so feel free to ask questions as you get into it.

A couple things since you're just starting out:

1. Many fly lines are tapered. If you bought a "double taper" (labelled "DT") fly line, both ends are identical so it doesn't matter which end you put on the fly reel first. But if you bought a "weight forward" (labelled "WF") fly line, the "front" of the fly line will be noticeably thicker than the rear end that gets attached to your backing. You'll be able to easily tell just by looking at it.

Normally when you buy a new WF fly line, the thin end is on top. Since it gets attached to your backing, as you reel the line on the spool, the thicker, heavier front of the "weight forward" taper ends up on top of the spool. This will give you the oomph you need to cast. If you put the line on backwards (and it happens), you'll end up with the thinner, lighter end on top and it may not load the rod. Double check to make sure you have the fly line on correctly

2. How much line did you have outside the tip? Fly lines are labelled with "weights" based on the first 30 feet of fly line so if you have just 10-20 feet out of the tip you'll have difficulty loading the rod if you're just starting out.

If none of those things are an issue, hopefully a call to Jason will sort it out if the wrong line was sent by mistake, but larry (mcnerney) is right about rods and lines-- sometimes it's hard to tell whether a given brand/model of line will work well with a specific rod when starting out--- more experienced casters can accommodate different lines by varying their casting stroke. Going up a size by "overlining" (using a 6 weight line on a 5 weight rod) may help. (A lot of lines like Rio Grand etc are deliberately made a bit heavy anyway to help casting).

Seajay- unfortunately there's no easy way to tell what weight the fly line is unless you get it from the packaging. If you have a lot of different rods, reels, spools and lines it can get pretty confusing. And if you rely on stickers put on the inside of reel spools, they often come off.

What some people do is code the front of fly lines with a permanent magic marker (like a Sharpie) to keep track. A long dash indicates a "5", a short dash indicates "1" . So folks mark up the front of their fly lines like so:

3 weight= dash dash dash
5 weight= loooongdaaaash
6 weight= loooooongdaaaaaash dash
8 weight = looooongdaaaaaash dash dash dash
12 weight= looooooongdaaaaaash looooongdaaaaaash dash dash
etc etc

Other than that, the only other way is to actually weight the first 30 feet of fly line on a postal scale or kitchen/diet scale and converting the weight in grains (how fly lines are measured) to grams or ounces depending on the scale. At the risk of making your head explode,

1 gram = 15.4323 grains
1 ounce = 28.3495 grams = 437.499 grains

So if you have a 5 weight line, the first 30 feet should weigh 140 grains (allowable range 134-146 grains)

Or from 8.68306 to 9.46065 grams

Hope this helps- keep us posted.
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