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Old 06-22-2010, 03:35 PM
peregrines peregrines is offline
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Default Re: Dont you just hate it

Dsssox13
It sure can be frustrating. You’ve gotten great responses. Just to add to what the others have said.
-try to make sure you’re getting a natural presentation with a drag free drift,
-anticipate what you might find hatching on stream by consulting with a fly shop and having a few patterns of the most likely suspects,
-once on stream, try and match the naturals as best as you can in order of priority size, shade (light, medium dark), profile and color,
-look for evidence of feeding—are they on nymphs, emergers, duns, spinners caddis pupa and adults.
-carry a few terrestrial patterns (hoppers, ants and a few beetles). These are good dries to search with you attempts to match the hatch.
This link on “mending” might help you get a drag free drift.
Fly Fishing, Fly Presentation, Mending - MidCurrent
These guys in Pepperell should be able to help with local knowledge of hatches and suggestions on patterns
Evening Sun Fly Shop - northern Massachusetts and southern New Hampshire - Fly fishing & fly tying supplies, equipment, and instruction
And as Mosca and others have said, learning about some of the major hatches and how to recognize them and how to fish them will help improve your odds of hooking up (and can be pretty interesting and fun when you get into it).
This time of year (late June/July) there are a bunch of insects that could be hatching, and this will vary from stream to stream, but some of the more common ones you’re likely to run into are:
Sulphurs (Ephemerella dorothea) 16-18
Sulphurs (Ephemerella invaria, rotunda) 14 - 16
Light Cahills (Stenonema candense)
Blue Wing Olives (Baetis vagans) 18-20
Tiny Blue Wing Olives (Pseudocleon anoka) 22-24
Tan Caddis (Hydropsyche various species) olive gray body, tan wing ginger hackle size 14-18
Alderfly/Zebra Caddis (Macronema zebratum) with dark gray body, Mottled tan and brown wing, brown hackle size 12-14
You can find more info on these hatches and pictures of the live insects in various stages of their life cycle by looking them up on Troutnut.com Fly Fishing for Trout

If you want to learn more about hatches in your area I highly recommend this book (BTW a lot of the hatches in the book are also found in streams all over the East.):
Amazon.com: Hatch Guide for New England Streams (0066066004246): Thomas Ames Jr., David B. Tibbetts: Books Amazon.com: Hatch Guide for New England Streams (0066066004246): Thomas Ames Jr., David B. Tibbetts: Books

for about 14 bucks

Good luck!
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