The North American Fly Fishing Forum


Go Back   The North American Fly Fishing Forum > General Fly Fishing Discussion > Coldwater Fly Fishing

Coldwater Fly Fishing Trout, Salmon, Steelhead, etc...

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 08-03-2009, 05:21 PM
New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Monroe, TN
Posts: 2
mauser_kar98k is on a distinguished road
Default New Flier with many questions on flyies.

Hello everyone. I'm a new guy here on the NAFFF, and am still fairly new to Fly rod and reel. I purchased one of Cabela's insane deals for a 9 foot, 8 weight line rod with a Cabela's CSR Fly reel #3 for just under $95 last year in Fort Worth, Texas. I used to drive a big truck, did for two years, but I'm going to school hear shortly in the backwoods of Tennesse. However, in the past year, I have been collecting as much information and what deals I can get for good gear.

My casting isn't great, but it is a lot better than it had been. Just by going through here I gained an understanding why I was snapping flies off. Now I just need to learn how to do a roll cast.

Only fish i have caught was a rock-bass at a truck stop, with a pond, in Clarksville, AR. Other than that, about three trees, and a hand full of shrubs. I don't remember the fly I had, but it did work. Little black thing with a small eye. Ran out of them and wish i had more (if I didn't keep snapping them).

I'm finding that the waters I have her in the Upper Cumberland River systems here have a bunch of trout, lots of blue-gill, sun fish, and I'm hoping bass. I like fishing bass, but I have never caught a trout until a few days ago just by chance on a regular fishing rod.

What are the basic things and flies I need for this? I would love to at least start catching something except for the occasional pine-tree. Plus, how do I get my fly to sink in cold, fast moving waters? I'm fishing out of deep/shallow lake (Dale Hollow Lake) and the Caney Fork, Cumberland, and Obey Rivers.

Thanks all.

Last edited by mauser_kar98k; 08-03-2009 at 05:22 PM. Reason: Spelling
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 08-03-2009, 08:54 PM
mcnerney's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Pinedale, WY
Posts: 12,939
Blog Entries: 45
mcnerney has a reputation beyond reputemcnerney has a reputation beyond reputemcnerney has a reputation beyond reputemcnerney has a reputation beyond reputemcnerney has a reputation beyond reputemcnerney has a reputation beyond reputemcnerney has a reputation beyond reputemcnerney has a reputation beyond reputemcnerney has a reputation beyond reputemcnerney has a reputation beyond reputemcnerney has a reputation beyond repute
Default

First off welcome to the forum and the great sport of fly fishing. For specific flies that work in your area I would visit a local fly shop and ask questions and buy a few of their flies for the help. Sounds like you definitely need to spend a little time learnig the roll cast, you will find that the effort will pay off in far fewer lost flies due to trees. Here is a thread where Pocono does an excellent job of describing the proper technique: Casting Analysis
You can fly fish using a number of different techniques. For fast water you might want to try streamer fishing where you either use a weighted streamer or maybe attach a bit of weight to the leader or better yet use a sink tip fly line to help get the streamer down into the water column. Another idea would be to use a dry/dropper arrangement where you have a dry fly as a point fly and then tie on 14-16" of tippet material and then tie on a small weighted nymph as a dropper and then concentrate on fishing the seams or around obstacles. Or another possiblity would be to just nymph fish, in this case you tie some sort of indicator/bobber to the top of the leader and then tie on a nymph at the bottom and then 14-16" below tie another nymph on. Then put some crimp on weight between the two nymphns. Then adjust the indicator so it is roughly 1 1/2 to 2 times the depth of the water for starters. If you not tapping bottom occasionally then move the indicator up some, if snagging or picking up moss move the indicator down some. Just takes some playing with. A technique I use while nymphing is to stand in the river and cast upstream, as the rig floats below you at the end of the drift you can pull the line to the top of the water and then just toss the whole rig back upstream so there is no real cast involved and it lessens the chance of tangling the two nymph setup. Good luck and keep asking questions we will try to help! You might also ask the local fly shop if there are any fly fishing clubs in your area or if they know someone who would help mentor you. You will be surprised at how much faster you will learn the proper techniques with someone to help.

Larry
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 08-04-2009, 07:12 AM
HuronRiverDan's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Monroe, Michigan
Posts: 2,584
HuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant futureHuronRiverDan has a brilliant future
Send a message via Yahoo to HuronRiverDan
Default Welcome...

To the site...and welcome to flyfishing. Check with your local flyshops and find out where the local fly clubs are. You said you have an 8wt, you may want to try going with a little lighter rod for your bluegill and small trout streams.

Check your local library also to see if they have fly fishing videos or books, they can be a great help to you.

Dan
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 08-04-2009, 02:35 PM
AKJay's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 28
AKJay will become famous soon enough
Default

For casting, nothing ever replaces hands on learning from someone but try looking up "Tight Lines Casting" on Youtube...Tim Landwehr from Tight Lines does a great job at teaching both standard casting techniques as well as the roll cast I believe.
In regard to flies, it really will depend on the area and the local fly shop will probably know best but go down to the area you will fish and look around. See what insects and other small animals are around and look for something that would mimic that. If I had to recommend a single fly for trout fishing it would be a brown elk hair caddis though.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 08-04-2009, 04:20 PM
Rip Tide's Avatar
Senior Member

 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: quiet corner, ct
Posts: 5,466
Rip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond reputeRip Tide has a reputation beyond repute
Default

I can't remember who this quote is by, but a very wise man once said;

"90% of what a trout eats is 5/8ths of an inch long and brown"

__________________
The simpler the outfit, the more skill it takes to manage it, and the more pleasure one gets in his achievements. --- Horace Kephart
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 08-04-2009, 06:55 PM
New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Monroe, TN
Posts: 2
mauser_kar98k is on a distinguished road
Default

Thanks all. I'm not sure where there are any fly shops around this area. Lots of bait shops, but only a handful carry a handful of fly gear. Which is odd. But I'm looking on youtube and other places for the casting techniques. I'm getting better at it with every cast, but it's just trying to find the right flies for all I do.

Thanks again.
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 08-05-2009, 12:00 PM
Super Moderator/Fly Swap Coordinator
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 4,019
peregrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond reputeperegrines has a reputation beyond repute
Default

Hey Mauser, welcome to the forum and congrats on taking up fly fishing. You've got some great fishing there, and it sounds like you're doing best to take advantage of it, though the trees seem like a challenge- we've all been there I haven't fished too much down your way, but I'll chime in for what it's worth just to give you some ideas, but take my advice with a grain of salt and defer to local knowledge from folks that have a better handle on the local fishing.

An 8 weight is a great bass (both largemouth smallmouth) and streamer rod for big trout. It will be a little heavy for panfish and “normal” trout fishing with dry flies and nymphs, where a 5 weight would generally be more common. But you can certainly use it for them too if that’s what you’ve got. It just might be more difficult to get a stealthy presentation.

You’ve gotten great advice about getting recommendations from a local fly shop, but it sounds like you’re having a problem finding one.

I’m not sure where you are in TN since I’m a Yankee and don’t get down there too much, but here are some places to check out. If you’re anywhere near Knoxville, there’s www.creelflyfishing.com

In Nashville check out http://cumberlandtransit.com/page.cfm?PageID=58 It has a free upcoming Intro to Fly Fishing Class on Aug 20 and a Fly Casting Class for 10 bucks on Aug 22 (check their upcoming events page) and there is or was Fly South in Nashville (not sure if they’re still in business because their website seems like it down, but you can try giving them a call at (615) 251-6199, and there is/was a flyshop at Caney Fork Outdoors in Silver Point 931-585-2222. There’s also www.timsfliesandlies.com in Lynchburg (as well as having a shop, and doing guided trips, he offers casting lessons for 20 bucks and hour which might be a good investment if you feel like you need a tuneup and are close to him)

If you can’t find a shop near by, some basics would cover you for now. Flies for trout will vary quite a bit depending on the water type since different food types will be more prevalent in tailwater streams compared to freestone streams like the Tellico-- and since it sounds like you fish a lot of tailwaters, generation schedules will affect the fishing, with high generation = big streamers and periods of low generation where smaller flies like scuds, midges and caddis might be a better choice. Panfish and smallmouth and largemouth bass flies will differ from trout stuff to some extent too. But you can put together some basics that will cover you for a bunch of different situations with some patterns that will do double duty for bass and trout and then build on them with specific recommendations from shops down there.
Here are a few patterns that might be good for your 8 weight, just to get you started:

Black Conehead marabou muddler size 6- The heavy weight of the conehead will help the fly get down in fast water and this one might be a good choice for high flows, heavy generation for big trout, and would be a good small mouth and largemouth fly too.

Black Bead Head Wooly Bugger size 8 and olive size 10. These are good all around patterns for trout and bass. The smaller size 10 olive also doubles for dragon/damsel fly nymph in slower water lakes and ponds.

White Zonker size 6 for high generation below dams when shad get washed over. It’s also a good imitation for them in lakes. A good choice for big trout below dams and bass (including stripers and wipers if you fish for them down there) in lakes.

Grasshopper pattern size 10 good topwater dry fly for trout and bass in summer

Chartreuse Clouser Minnow a great smallmouth fly for moving water

Crayfish imitation another good smallie fly

Gurgler a great topwater smallmouth and largemouth fly in moving water

Bass popper size 4 or 6 great for largemouth late in the day for weedy areas in lakes and ponds or slow moving streams.

Smaller stuff for trout and panfish, generally fished on 4, 5 and 6 weight outfits. These would be good choices for the generally small stuff that hatches in tailwaters like the Cumberland, Clinch and Caney during low flows. This can be tough fishing with small flies, light tippets and very selective/finicky trout. I generally prefer larger flies for panfish in size 10-12 so they don’t swallow them, but these flies will work for them too.

Dries (add a paste type dry fly floatant like DAB or Ghinke)
Tan Elk Hair Caddis size 16
Parachute Adams size 16 and 18
Foam ant and/or beetle size 14 good summer time trout fly, and always a good choice for panfish.

Nymphs
Zebra Midge olive or black size 18 is a good choice for tailwaters when there’s not too much water being released. Fish it as Larry suggested as a “dropper” using a dry fly on top, and tying a short section of tippet to the bend of the dry fly with an improved clinch knot and dangling the midge about 12” below it.

Olive or Gray Scud size 14 below dams during low flows for trout

Bead Head Pheasant Tail Nymph size 18 another good tailwater fly, as well as all around trout pattern.

Green Bead Head Caddis Pupa size 14, a good searching fly for trout in streams

Panfish popper size 10 or 12 great bream fly and fun to fish

You might want to check out Trout Unlimited and the Federation of Fly Fishers to see if there is a local TU chapter or FFF affiliated club near you. It’s a great way to jump start your fly fishing career—lot’s of informative meetings casting clinics, and group trips to local waters, and lot’s of local intel on the local fishing. Here’s some places to do a search:
TU http://www.tu.org/site/c.kkLRJ7MSKtH...ter_Search.htm
FFF
http://www.fedflyfishers.org/Default.aspx?tabid=4357

Good luck, I hope some of this info helps a bit. Keep asking questions, I'm sure folks will do their best to get you going.

mark
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On














All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
2005-2014 The North American Fly Fishing Forum. All rights reserved.