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TexUte Fly 07-19-2011 09:34 PM

dry fly presentation?
 
so today i went out and nymphed for about 2 hours. nothin... i saw about 10-15 drakes flying around so i thought id throw one on and try, well i tried a dry dropper rig or whatever its called when you put a nymph under a dry. i didnt get nothin in about an hour, i walked down the stream constantly casting trying all water. i did notice that sometimes my fly would be on its side or upside down. does this matter? if so how do i fix this? i know i suck at dry casting but i dont feel like thats the problem.

natermotor 07-19-2011 10:17 PM

Re: dry fly presentation?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac. (Post 288820)
so today i went out and nymphed for about 2 hours. nothin... i saw about 10-15 drakes flying around so i thought id throw one on and try, well i tried a dry dropper rig or whatever its called when you put a nymph under a dry. i didnt get nothin in about an hour, i walked down the stream constantly casting trying all water. i did notice that sometimes my fly would be on its side or upside down. does this matter? if so how do i fix this? i know i suck at dry casting but i dont feel like thats the problem.

Fish are finnecky... Sometimes it will matter, and sometimes it won't, atleast that's my experience. If the fly has hackle on it, you can snip the hackle off the bottom of the fly so it stabalizes, kind of like an outrigger canoe.

Good luck,

Nate

madjoni 07-20-2011 04:05 AM

Re: dry fly presentation?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac. (Post 288820)
so today i went out and nymphed for about 2 hours. nothin... i saw about 10-15 drakes flying around so i thought id throw one on and try, well i tried a dry dropper rig or whatever its called when you put a nymph under a dry. i didnt get nothin in about an hour, i walked down the stream constantly casting trying all water. i did notice that sometimes my fly would be on its side or upside down. does this matter? if so how do i fix this? i know i suck at dry casting but i dont feel like thats the problem.

Hi
For begging lose that nymph.That is not dry fly fishing and that nymph can affect how dry fly is siting on water .Find the raising trout and use one dry fly.If that trout want take your fly in couple casts and it still collecting something from surface change the fly...If it stop to collect natural flies then search for another trout:).........

Pocono 07-20-2011 07:17 AM

Re: dry fly presentation?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac. (Post 288820)
so today i went out and nymphed for about 2 hours. nothin... i saw about 10-15 drakes flying around so i thought id throw one on and try, well i tried a dry dropper rig or whatever its called when you put a nymph under a dry. i didnt get nothin in about an hour, i walked down the stream constantly casting trying all water. i did notice that sometimes my fly would be on its side or upside down. does this matter? if so how do i fix this? i know i suck at dry casting but i dont feel like thats the problem.

Presentation does matter with dry flies. In fact it may be the single most important aspect of dry fly fishing.

Generally, when you're fishing a dry/dropper, you're planning for the take to be on the dropper; that's why most people will use a big, meaty dry for the top fly; like a Wulff, or something like that. In some cases, it's almost like nymphing with an indicator. In others, where there's a lot of surface feeding; particularly in faster moving water, you're just as apt to get a strike on the dry as on the dropper.

A dropper on a dry fly will weight it down and make a soft presentation difficult (not impossible, but certainly more challenging). My experience is that if fish are feeding on the top, then you're very likely to get a take the minute the fly hits the water; particularly if the presentation is soft.

Try aiming your cast a foot or two above the water and let the dry "float down" onto the surface. Don't try to cast directly at the water, If you do that, then your dry will land with a "splat" and that's not the way that trout are used to seeing a fly settle on the surface.

If you're going to try to catch fish by imitating a mature insect, then take some time before you start casting; watch the water. See what happening with the insect life; what kind of flies are on the water, what size, what color, how do they land, how long do they stay on the water, are trout top-water feeding? Then, if you decide to go with a dry fly, try to cast in such a way that you present your fly the same way that the insects are landing on the water.

I agee with MJ, if you're going to be dry fly fishing, then stick with one dry. Change it out if you're continuing to sees rises, but getting no takes.

Pocono

silver creek 07-20-2011 10:39 AM

Re: dry fly presentation?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac. (Post 288820)
so today i went out and nymphed for about 2 hours. nothin... i saw about 10-15 drakes flying around so i thought id throw one on and try, well i tried a dry dropper rig or whatever its called when you put a nymph under a dry. i didnt get nothin in about an hour, i walked down the stream constantly casting trying all water. i did notice that sometimes my fly would be on its side or upside down. does this matter? if so how do i fix this? i know i suck at dry casting but i dont feel like thats the problem.

Just because there are insects in the air does not mean those same insects are on or in the water. So I am not surprised no fish took the fly. Even when there are insect on the water does not guarantee the fish are taking them. If you saw a rise and you actually saw the fish take that insect, then your question is valid.

About the the fly not landing correctly, there are several possible reasons. The first is that it is a poorly tied dry fly and would tip over even if there were no dropper. This can occur on parachute flies for example, where some of the hackle hangs lower on one side than the other. Or it can happen with comparaduns and sparkle duns with an asymmetric wing or even aymmetric tail fibers that are tilted lower on one side than the other. So carefully examine the fly.

The second reason is leader twist either from an aerodynamically unstable dry fly that spins during the cast OR by an oval casting motion. Both will twist the leader and the torque of the leader will torque the fly on its side. To diagnose twist, lift the fly up and see if the leader spins the fly.

A dry fly lying on its side is not normal. There is a cause, you just need to find it.

troutslayer 07-20-2011 08:39 PM

Re: dry fly presentation?
 
Sometimes fish are just finnicky! They won't take anything even though they are obviously feeding on something. My go-to fly is the Adams#16 dry. I try that usually first. If that doesn't work I have gone down to tieing on some ^X tippet to my line and float a#20 Griffith's Gnat or #18 or 20 midge and that has worked sometimes. They normally are always are feeding on midges. If they are just sipping from the surface, try the smaller flies. Or try to float something in the surface like a midge emerger. Sometimes it's time to go find another fish because if they become stubborn, you can work all day on him and still not catch him. Then you get frustrated and think you are a poor fisherman. Remember, they make a living eating and swimming and they know what's real and what isn't. This is called 'fishing', not catching! Frustrating sometimes? Yes! Rewarding when the fish is on? Absolutely! Keep at it!

fyshstykr 07-21-2011 12:13 AM

Re: dry fly presentation?
 
Don't beat yourself up too badly, that part of the river gets pounded, even more so now that the Green Drakes started a few days ago. Fish become wary and have seen many a fly, so fishing gets tougher. This is all part of your learning.

I agree with the thought from above that if you don't see fish actively rising, then stay with a nymph (or even an emerger fished down in the water column). And once you do see fish rising you have to decide if they are eating emergers just under/or in the surface film or if they are eating adults? OR something all together different. Once you have made a decision....fish to the fish, don't cast randomly in hopes of catching the odd fish unless you just want casting practice.

You didn't mention what flies you tried?

TexUte Fly 07-25-2011 12:14 AM

Re: dry fly presentation?
 
i tried everything. caddis, stone flies, worms, prince tails. then as for dries just drakes, but in my new post i figured it out =)


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