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Old 03-15-2012, 10:00 PM
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Default Targeting

I often think about how I fish and wonder if its possible to target one species of trout in a stream that has many. Say wanted to increase my chances of catching Rainbows in a stream that has browns and brookies. Or if I wanted to increase my chances of catching brookies in the same stream. What would I look for? how could I do it?
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Old 03-15-2012, 10:15 PM
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Default Re: Targeting

Different species of trout have vary distinct preferences in habitat conditions. For instance your rainbow trout may exhibit a penchant for swifter currents. Here in Alaska as well as everywhere I have ever trout fished, if I am about the business of locating rainbow trout I will be in the swift water swinging my fly. This is not to say that you will not encounter this species in other conditions but generally speaking if a water shed is host to multiple species the rainbow will gravitate to the swifter currents.

Brown trout and Brook trout both like a feeding lane (if available) that offerers a close shelter if they feel they need to disappear. This is part and partial to the argument that often arises when a State Dept. of Fisheries proposes introduction of the brown trout to waters that have been or are historically brook trout habitat. The brown in its nature is more aggressive in obtaining both shelter, feeding and spawning areas than the brook trout. With the fact that most strains of browns grow a bit more quickly and have the genetic capacity to grow to much larger proportions than the brook trout in most watersheds they rapidly take over the more prime areas from the smaller Native fishes.

So, in short; in an integrated stream the bows in the swift waters, the browns in good holding and shelter waters, and the brook trout in the upper reaches or less desirable waters but these conditions will closely mirror the holds of your browns.

Hope that will help you out some,

Ard


PS. I would like to add that the information I have provided is a reflection of my own observations and experiences fishing for trout. I am sure that there are much more in depth materials available regarding the original question. I however give answers based on what I personally know or at least I think that I know rather than simply link you to some other site or official research. What I have told you can be related to by a quote from the Late Hunter S. Thompson, "Although I can't recommend it for everyone, it's always worked for me"
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Old 03-15-2012, 11:57 PM
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Default Re: Targeting

It depends on the season and the stream but a general rule is that the browns will be found at a lower elevation in the stream followed by the bows, then the cutts and finally the brookies. (in Rocky Mountain Streams anyway) Of course they all overlap and migrate due to spawning, etc and then you need to know the species you are targeting and the seasons for it.
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Old 03-20-2012, 10:53 PM
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Default Re: Targeting

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Originally Posted by Hardyreels View Post

Brown trout and Brook trout both like a feeding lane (if available) that offerers a close shelter if they feel they need to disappear. This is part and partial to the argument that often arises when a State Dept. of Fisheries proposes introduction of the brown trout to waters that have been or are historically brook trout habitat. The brown in its nature is more aggressive in obtaining both shelter, feeding and spawning areas than the brook trout. With the fact that most strains of browns grow a bit more quickly and have the genetic capacity to grow to much larger proportions than the brook trout in most watersheds they rapidly take over the more prime areas from the smaller Native fishes.
Really? I never would have thought this. In alberta, brook trout are almost considered invasive in some streams. They take over cutthroat/brown populations in a matter of years. They become a huge issue. There is a ton of little unmarked creeks down in SW alberta that are loaded with stunted brookies. Meaning way over populated and small.
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Old 03-21-2012, 07:38 AM
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Default Re: Targeting

Around here the bows are generally 'in' the feeding lane, like a fat kid at the desert table at a buffet. The rainbows seem to like to spend a little more energy as long as they are in the feeding trough.
Browns hang in the back eddies and slower flowing water near overhangs, below pouroffs and ledges. They like to ambush things kind of like bass. They love to hide by a big undercut rock or bank.
I find the biggest Browns in 'the slowest deepest water near the fastest water', generally in bigger pools and very deep.
A good way to insure browns over 12" is a 3" streamer.

The rainbows here are picky, but will often allow several casts in front of their face, just waiting for the one they like.
The browns seem less picky about the fly, but cast to them more than three times and they are in hiding, spooked for a good 15 minutes.

For brookies I use small dry/dropper setups higher in the creek; not as sure about selecting for them though except for geographically/elevation.

Of course, there are times that all the rules get broken: big brown on a #20 midge, rainbow on a big streamer, brookie down in town...

But yes, if all I have been catching is rainbows, I will start fishing slower deeper water to find the browns.

I still have not done the 'rocky mountain grand slam'; brook, brown, rainbow, cutthroat all in a day. Very possible around here though with a little targeting.
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Old 03-21-2012, 03:06 PM
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Default Re: Targeting

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Originally Posted by bhflyfisher View Post
Really? I never would have thought this. In alberta, brook trout are almost considered invasive in some streams. They take over cutthroat/brown populations in a matter of years. They become a huge issue. There is a ton of little unmarked creeks down in SW alberta that are loaded with stunted brookies. Meaning way over populated and small.
I'm aware of the brook trouts 'invasive' classification in the Rocky Mountain west. This is the result of introductions by various states and provinces in most cases. If you have a situation where brook trout are actually winning the battle for territory over brown trout it may be occurring where the browns are also small and perhaps not numerous. In the eastern United States the exact opposite is often the case.

When dealing with fish like cutthroat trout who are also likely to be found in small streams in their upper reaches it is all too clear how the brook trout would pose a threat to the native species. The best you can hope for in some cases is large brook trout I guess.

Ard
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Old 03-21-2012, 10:57 PM
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Default Re: Targeting

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Originally Posted by Hardyreels View Post
What I have told you can be related to by a quote from the Late Hunter S. Thompson, "Although I can't recommend it for everyone, it's always worked for me"
That is so how it is, good advise and great quote! Can I copy your disclaimer

Quote:
Originally Posted by tbblom View Post
all the rules get broken
I think when you shorten that up, you hit it spot on Well and the 3" streamer

only adipose, over time I think you will figure that out, that being how to target certain species more or less at certain times. It may not be everyday that you go out and know what to do for what species, for that matter your just trying to catch a fish let alone be picky about which one.

Other times you may have an idea that certain species of fish may be apt to take a streamer one day and other species a mouse or egg for instance. Knowing when, where and what to use has allowed me to target particular species of fish versus just fishing for what ever is biting.

In all good time you will have a better idea of what to do and when for any particular species and the more often you do it the more common that will become. I believe it varies from region to region and the advise you have been given this far is spot on! Except for when its not.

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