The North American Fly Fishing Forum


Go Back   The North American Fly Fishing Forum > General Fly Fishing Discussion > Coldwater Fly Fishing

Coldwater Fly Fishing Trout, Salmon, Steelhead, etc...

Like Tree150Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2015, 01:19 PM
wishyouwerehere's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Pittsburgh, Pennslyvania
Posts: 9
wishyouwerehere is on a distinguished road
Default Few people handle and release trout properly.

To start with, i'm not saying these words to anyone on this Forum as i know most fly fisherman are conservation minded and are interested in keeping fish alive. This goes to everyone on this forum as a call for action more than anything.

As with every single time I'm fishing and there's other people on the water, the amount of ignorance and lack of respect for Trout ****ing astounds me. Here in Pennsylvania we love trout fishing, and everyone wants to catch them but nobody gives enough of a damn to learn how to increase their survival rates and the damn hatcheries don't seem to care enough to try to educate people. Every time someone other than me, my dad or another fly fisherman catches a trout it makes cringe. Not out of jealousy, or spite but because the way they handle these trout. I rarely see anyone use a net, occasionally see people wet their hands, i've seen too many people throw them on land before releasing them, seen people step on the trout to control it, seen them tear hooks out of their throats just to release the fish and many more despicable things that make me ask every time "well why don't you just keep the ****ing thing then?".

In PA especially its a real [Edit] epidemic, and i assume in most states with a larger concentration of people its also a huge problem. Nobody puts up signs oh how to handle fish (something i'm going to start doing now), nobody speaks up when someone just about kills a trout then throws it back into the water and its a real problem here. We pay for our trout every year when we buy our license and here in PA we have streams and rivers that actually support trout throughout the year as well as delayed harvests and FFO sections. And yet even on those special regulations sections I still see people pretty much killing trout unintentionally. So we have a good reason to release trout properly, so i'm asking everyone who lives in PA who reads this and anywhere else this is a problem to help spread the word, help teach people these things, because nobody seems to understand the concept of a slow death over time for the trout, everyone thinks if it swims away its fine.

Don't Put a trout on dry land, ever!
Don't throw the trout in the water, place it in the water until it swims away.
Don't touch its gills!
Do not squeeze the fish, hold it gently.
Always wet your [Edit] hands.
Use a landing net when possible.
If possible don't touch the fish at all.
If the hook gets swallowed, quickly cut the line close to the hook.
Don't keep the trout out of water for longer than 20-30 seconds at a time.

Those are just the basic rules i can think of, and i follow them always. TROUT ARE NOT BASS OR SUN FISH, they are easy to kill, sensitive fish that use a protective slime to guard them instead of just plain old scales. Please, i'm asking everyone out there to help spread the knowledge and help to reduce fish mortality rates. Even on this very forum i see far too many pictures of trout laying on dry land next to some schmucks fly rod to show the size. Ignorance is the problem, if you don't know you can't do it right.

Last edited by Hardyreels; 05-25-2015 at 01:33 PM. Reason: Language edit
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2015, 01:30 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Southwest Oregon
Posts: 46
bluewater is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Few people handle and release trout properly.

All true, both the advice and the observations, but Wish, dude, these days the decaffeinated stuff is just as tasty as the real thing. Just sayin'
__________________
It's never too late while you're breathing.
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2015, 01:36 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 60
troutma99 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Few people handle and release trout properly.

All good advice.

I would add, since it is getting warmer as we approach summer, be careful playing and releasing trout in warmer water. If you fish a shallow stream on a 95 degree day, unless it's a tailwater, the water will probably be pretty warm. Trout need to be revived longer in warmer water before they can be released.
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2015, 01:42 PM
ia_trouter's Avatar
Senior Member

 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Eastern Iowa, Quad Cities
Posts: 3,342
ia_trouter has much to be proud ofia_trouter has much to be proud ofia_trouter has much to be proud ofia_trouter has much to be proud ofia_trouter has much to be proud ofia_trouter has much to be proud ofia_trouter has much to be proud ofia_trouter has much to be proud ofia_trouter has much to be proud of
Default Re: Few people handle and release trout properly.

Nice rant. Somebody needs to go fishing soon. Happy Memorial Day.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2015, 05:23 PM
mtbusman's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: North Central Montana
Posts: 313
mtbusman is a jewel in the roughmtbusman is a jewel in the roughmtbusman is a jewel in the roughmtbusman is a jewel in the rough
Default Re: Few people handle and release trout properly.

Since I've been living in the same community for many years now, most of my acquaintances know I release the trout I catch. It often happens that if they ask me if I've been fishing, and I have a story about a fish I caught, they will respond with, "but I suppose you threw it back." "No," I explain. "I carefully removed the hook and then gently released it in the water." I get a grin out of answering that way, and people often say, "well, that's what I meant." But the words we use are telling. I don't know how successful I am, but I try to educate people nonetheless.
mcnerney, Bigfly, mikel and 3 others like this.
__________________
"Sometimes the least important thing about fishing is fishing." --Roderick Haig-Brown
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2015, 05:57 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Punta Gorda, Florida
Posts: 1,699
wolfglen is just really nicewolfglen is just really nicewolfglen is just really nicewolfglen is just really nice
Default Re: Few people handle and release trout properly.

It has always amazed me as to how the people who kill everything they catch are the ones who complain most about the fishing. Never could understand that.
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2015, 05:58 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 743
Blog Entries: 4
unknownflyman will become famous soon enoughunknownflyman will become famous soon enough
Default Re: Few people handle and release trout properly.

I'd kindly like to point out to the OP that griping the trout with one hand over the vitals as shown the their avatar pic is not a good grip for a picture. Supporting the fish in the tail and non vital areas and less than 10 seconds out of the water is critical especially in the warm summer months.

I usually unhook a fish and revive it before the less than 10 second photo and immediately get the fish back into the water for the swim off of the fish on its own.

Wet hands really help the slime coating but fish regenerate slime, after a battle oxygen is the key factor. Think about running a marathon and then some one takes away your ability to breath.


In my pictures a fish on the bank next to my flyrod means it didn't go back.

Most of the time I don't take pics, I twist out the fly with hemostats and gone, don't even touch it. I don't take a pic if it will risk the fish I don't want to keep.

Fishing by myself I take few pics unless the fish is in the water or going to the grill.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2015, 08:44 PM
Hardyreels's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
Posts: 12,757
Blog Entries: 75
Hardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond repute
Send a message via Yahoo to Hardyreels Send a message via Skype™ to Hardyreels
Default Re: Few people handle and release trout properly.

Well at least this thread didn't go off the rails Our original poster may want to stop and think when making a contribution that many folks here are past fish squeezing. Let's face facts, since the advent of the small digital point and shoot camera and the internet to post the pictures to, things have gotten rougher for trout. Whether we want to admit it or not all you need to do is scroll through the fish picture threads here and on other websites to find bad examples of fish handling.

I am a reformed fish molester and unless you were spawned under the fish signs you either did or are still keeping them from their water for too long just to get that perfect shot. When I see a picture which shows a fish out of water being held with one hand I kinda cringe. When you can hold them with a single hand it's because of one of two things. Either the fish is too exhausted to squirm and flip from your grip or you have it in a stranglehold. Yeah someone will argue this I'm sure but you are talking to the wrong guy if you do. I have done more things wrong than most fisherman because while most of you were pursuing a career or at least holding a regular job raising a family I was out there fishing. I don't know everything that's for sure but I know we could let them go with a lot less fussing around.

I think the intent of the post was honest but the approach and presentation could have been way better.

Ard
__________________
Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard

The Alaska Fishing & Outdoors Blog;
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2015, 09:07 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 42
unicoiboy is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Few people handle and release trout properly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by troutma99 View Post
All good advice.

I would add, since it is getting warmer as we approach summer, be careful playing and releasing trout in warmer water. If you fish a shallow stream on a 95 degree day, unless it's a tailwater, the water will probably be pretty warm. Trout need to be revived longer in warmer water before they can be released.
Better yet, don't fish for trout at all if the water is warm. We close our private waters from mid june to around September due to warm water. Trout can barely survive in water in the low seventies, when stressed they typically die. Imagine running a sprint for your life, holding your breath for 30 seconds, then having to breath through a coffee straw. This is how trout feel in warm water.
wishyouwerehere likes this.
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2015, 09:23 PM
wishyouwerehere's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Pittsburgh, Pennslyvania
Posts: 9
wishyouwerehere is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Few people handle and release trout properly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbusman View Post
Since I've been living in the same community for many years now, most of my acquaintances know I release the trout I catch. It often happens that if they ask me if I've been fishing, and I have a story about a fish I caught, they will respond with, "but I suppose you threw it back." "No," I explain. "I carefully removed the hook and then gently released it in the water." I get a grin out of answering that way, and people often say, "well, that's what I meant." But the words we use are telling. I don't know how successful I am, but I try to educate people nonetheless.
Lol I really enjoyed this post, and it is very telling because thats exactly what a lot of people i talk to say. "I threw it back". Thanks for the post, and its good to hear you're at least trying to educate. I just don't know how to talk to someone about releasing trout correctly without them getting pissed off at me.

---------- Post added at 08:23 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:16 PM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by unknownflyman View Post
I'd kindly like to point out to the OP that griping the trout with one hand over the vitals as shown the their avatar pic is not a good grip for a picture. Supporting the fish in the tail and non vital areas and less than 10 seconds out of the water is critical especially in the warm summer months.

I usually unhook a fish and revive it before the less than 10 second photo and immediately get the fish back into the water for the swim off of the fish on its own.

Wet hands really help the slime coating but fish regenerate slime, after a battle oxygen is the key factor. Think about running a marathon and then some one takes away your ability to breath.


In my pictures a fish on the bank next to my flyrod means it didn't go back.

Most of the time I don't take pics, I twist out the fly with hemostats and gone, don't even touch it. I don't take a pic if it will risk the fish I don't want to keep.

Fishing by myself I take few pics unless the fish is in the water or going to the grill.
Thanks for the post, and I'll start by saying that the Pic for my avatar is an older picture and since then i've learned a lot about trout and how to release them better. I leave them in the net for the picture and even in that pic I wasn't squeezing the fish i was cradling it and raised it just above the water. You're correct though, and fortunately on that sunny day the water was running extremely cold

Anyway I rarely take pictures, and I always do my best to give the trout the best chance of survival. Things rarely go as planned but i'd be damned if i didn't always try. The thing that gets me is that i'm 24 years old and most of the people I see who are unintentionally killing fish are 40+ years old, who really have no reason to not know these things. And if i ever screw up or don't treat a trout right when i've caught it, i don't go home thinking I did everything right to keep it alive, but everyone I see just have no remorse and no care about how they treat the fish and it says to me that they think they're releasing them ok, but they aren't and I'd just like to see that improve.

I was upset when i wrote the post, but it really is a damn problem in my area and it makes me cringe and breaks my heart. If anyone cringed at my Avatar picture lol then you wouldn't have wanted to see what a lot of the people did this weekend. The fishing was amazing this weekend, which mean't a lot of people caught trout which normally i'd be happy to see, but not when people are irresponsible with the trout. The only time i'd rather not see someone catch a fish is when they're gonna treat it the way these folks do.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Old people take care of 'old people. fredaevans The Lodge Den 0 04-27-2015 05:17 PM
How to fish a popper properly? turbineblade Warmwater Fly Fishing 10 08-13-2012 09:42 AM
How to Properly Fish.....(different flies) vapor10 General Discussion 10 09-24-2011 03:21 PM
large trout not getting hooked properly ffffg General Discussion 19 04-02-2006 11:16 PM













All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
2005-2015 The North American Fly Fishing Forum. All rights reserved.